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2014 - John G. Proakis

John G. Proakis

Known as a digital communications expert, inspiring educator, and prolific writer, John G. Proakis has helped shape electrical engineering and digital communications programs and composed textbooks that have influenced graduate students worldwide. Dr. Proakis developed an outstanding reputation of providing inspired teaching and supervision of students with an academic career that began in 1969 with the Electrical Engineering Department at Northeastern University, MA, USA. As the chair of Northeastern’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dr. Proakis helped transform the department from a teaching environment to a dynamic research-active department. Dr. Proakis also served as associate dean and director of Northeastern’s Graduate School of Engineering. Of his ten textbooks on digital communication and signal processing, Digital Communications (McGraw Hill) is perhaps the best known. Considered the most influential resource on the topic and now in its fifth edition, the textbook has educated generations of students and engineers about the fundamentals associated with the digital information age. His other influential textbooks include Introduction to Digital Signal Processing (Prentice Hall), Communication Systems Engineering (Prentice Hall), and Fundamentals of Communication Systems (Prentice Hall). Dr. Proakis has also expanded engineering education beyond theory to laboratory experiments and simulation techniques using computers and software. His textbooks in this area include Digital Signal Processing Using MATLAB (CL-Engineering) and Contemporary Communication Systems Using MATLAB and Simulink (Cengage Learning). Through these approachable books, Dr. Proakis has helped expose students early on to the MATLAB development and simulation tool that they will likely need to use throughout their professional careers. Dr. Proakis also served as editor of the five-volume Wiley Encyclopedia of Telecommunications.

An IEEE Life Fellow and recipient of the IEEE Signal Processing Society Education Award (2004), Dr. Proakis is a Professor Emeritus with Northeastern University and an Adjunct Professor at the University of California in San Diego, CA, USA.

 
 

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2013 - J. David Irwin

J. David Irwin

J. David Irwin’s dedicated leadership has influenced the growth of engineering education programs while serving as an exemplary role model for faculty and students for over four decades. Dr. Irwin has made substantial contributions to the modernization of Auburn University’s electrical and computer engineering (ECE) program. Through a number of strategic decisions and the motivation of faculty, staff, students, and alumni, he was able to change the culture of the department from one that was local in nature to one that thinks and operates globally. Named head of the then Electrical Engineering Department in 1973 and serving in that capacity until 2009, he is considered one of the longest-serving ECE department heads in the world. His accomplishments include developing what at the time was only the second microelectronics laboratory in southeastern United States. He oversaw the initial development of Auburn’s computer science and engineering program and was also instrumental in developing a first-of-its- kind accredited degree program in wireless engineering. Dr. Irwin also implemented the ECE Industrial Advisory Board to acquire industry input on how to improve the department’s educational experience, which served as a model for other engineering departments. Dr. Irwin’s influential textbooks have been used by hundreds of thousands of engineering students around the world. Many of his former students have become important industry leaders or outstanding educators in their own right. With expertise in circuit analysis and design, Dr. Irwin continues to teach and conduct research at Auburn today.


An IEEE Life Fellow and Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education, Dr. Irwin’s many honors include the Auburn University Mortar Board Distinguished Professor Award (2004) and the IEEE Education Society Meritorious Service Award (2005). He is currently the Earle C. Williams Eminent Scholar at Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA.

 
 

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2012 - Fawwaz T. Ulaby

Photo of 2012 IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal recipient Fawwaz T. Ulaby

Known for his pioneering research on microwave remote sensing radar technology, Fawwaz T. Ulaby has also established himself as an inspiring educator and mentor who has set new trends in teaching. Dr. Ulaby began teaching at the University of Kansas in 1968. He moved to the University of Michigan in 1984, where he developed several new courses. There he incorporated interactive audio and video tools to better demonstrate the principles of electromagnetic waves. He reinvented laboratory experiments, wrote new manuals, and developed comprehensive but accessible textbooks. Dr. Ulaby draws upon personal experiences to teach with passion, purpose, and respect and challenges his students to ask the difficult questions in pursuing what is best for society. His classic undergraduate textbook Fundamentals of Applied Electromagnetics (Prentice Hall) takes an approach directed at teaching students who would never otherwise pursue a career in electromagnetics, providing simple and easy-to-follow explanations. He creates enthusiasm by connecting the material to real-world applications by incorporating “technology briefs.” He also included interactive software for simulating electromagnetic fields and waves in 3D to better understand their behavior compared to 2D models. The book has been adopted by over 179 universities in the United States plus other institutions around the world. Dr. Ulaby’s graduate-level textbook Microwave Remote Sensing: Active and Passive (Addison-Wesley) has served as the gold standard for over 25 years. The book has been used as a primary or reference text in practically every microwave remote sensing course taught around the world.

An IEEE Life Fellow and member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Ulaby is currently the Emmet Leith Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 
 

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2011 - Raj Mittra

Photo of 2011 Mulligan recipient Mittra

Raj Mittra’s technical expertise and dedication to teaching have helped set the trends in electromagnetics research for over five decades. Dr. Mittra specializes in the design of electromagnetic systems such as radars, satellite antennas, communication systems, microwave and millimeter wave integrated circuits, and instruments for remote sensing and geophysical prospecting. His role in the design of these systems is primarily in the development of special-purpose computer programs and algorithms that are capable of solving problems that are well beyond the reach of commercially available computer codes. He has transferred his expertise to graduate and postdoctoral students through innovative classroom instruction at the University of Illinois, Pennsylvania State University, and with important publications and popular short courses. Dr. Mittra has graduated over 100 Ph.D. students and has mentored over 60 postdoctorates and visiting scholars who have specialized in the areas of computational electromagnetics, antennas, sensing, metamaterials, integrated circuits, and electronic packaging. He has published over 1,000 technical papers and more than 30 books or book chapters related to electromagnetics. Dr. Mittra has directed short courses on pioneering electromagnetics topics held at universities around the world and in-house at many companies, extending the reach of his knowledge beyond his classroom. He has attracted the best and brightest to study under him, and his students’ thesis work has often transferred to industry with lasting impact, providing more efficient and cost-effective design solutions.

An IEEE Life Fellow, Dr. Mittra is currently director of the Electromagnetic Communication Lab at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and has a part-time appointment as a Distinguished Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dammam, Saudi Arabia.
 

 
 

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2010 - Randy H. Katz

headshot of Randy Katz

A world-class educator and research advisor at the University of California, Berkeley, Randy Howard Katz has made a profound impact on engineering education at Berkeley. Dr. Katz has graduated more Ph.D. students in computer science, and more female computer scientists, than any other Berkeley computer science faculty member. One third of his students have now become faculty members at other leading universities and institutions. Dr. Katz is well known at Berkeley for being a dynamic lecturer. He brings his passion for teaching to the undergraduate level with creative freshman seminars such as “From Smoke Signals to the Internet” and “IT Goes to War.” His freshman seminars offer an opportunity for faculty members and small groups of freshmen to engage in discussions on various computer science topics.  
 
Katz also teaches a VLSI design course, and his lecture notes led to his very successful textbook, Contemporary Logic Design, that has been used by more than 200 universities worldwide and is considered the market-leading textbook for introductory hardware design courses. Dr. Katz was one of the first to revolutionize how logic design is taught by incorporating field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). With FPGAs, the logic functions are programmed in small memories, making it ideal for teaching students how to design logic and making the labs more affordable. Today, most universities that teach logic design use the FPGA methods pioneered by Dr. Katz.
 
An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Katz is currently the United Microelectronics Corporation Distinguished Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1983.
 

 
 

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2009 - Jose B. Cruz, Jr.

photo of Jose Cruz, jr.

Jose B. Cruz, Jr. has educated generations of undergraduate and graduate students over his 45-year career, instilling the qualities of technical excellence in research and teaching and inspired professional service. Many of his graduates have become academic leaders or hold prominent positions in industry. Dr. Cruz has been readily accessible for advice and mentoring to his former students and junior colleagues.

At the University of Illinois he developed a new organization and presentation of material for a course on circuit theory leading to a textbook published in 1967 with M.E. Van Valkenburg, and he introduced, with W.R. Perkins, an undergraduate course on dynamic systems that was control oriented and unique in that it used a themed example (attitude control of a spacecraft) throughout the course, also leading to a textbook (in 1969). These textbooks contained pioneering methods for introducing advanced concepts at an elementary level.

While at the University of California, Irvine, from 1986 to 1992, working with James H. Mulligan, Jr., Dr. Cruz established strong ties with industry in developing manufacturing systems research and jointly supervised Ph.D. students incorporating feedback from industry. As a consultant on the Engineering and Science Education Project of the Philippine Dept. of Science and Technology from 1993–1998, he helped to establish a practice-oriented Master of Engineering Degree Program focused on an industry-linked project in several Philippine universities. An IEEE Life Fellow, Cruz is currently a Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the Ohio State University, Columbus, where he previously served as Dean of the College of Engineering.

 
 

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2008 - Joseph Bordogna

photo of Joseph Bordogna

Joseph Bordogna has demonstrated his commitment to improving engineering education through the establishment of learning programs which integrate research and education and encourage diversity. Dr. Bordogna is currently the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), where he previously served as Director of the Moore School of Electrical Engineering and Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Over three decades ago, while at the University of Pennsylvania, he created an alternative liberal arts degree program based in the university’s engineering school, established an innovative dual-degree program in management and technology, co-developed one of the academic world’s first electro-optic graduate programs and laboratories, and was a founder of the Philadelphia Regional Introduction for Minorities to Engineering (PRIME). As Deputy Director and Chief Operating Officer of the National Science Foundation (NSF), he led the establishment of integrative education and research programs, with long lasting impact at all levels of study. Dr. Bordogna enabled NSF communities to reach new scientific heights, achieve workforce diversity and vital collaborations in and across many disciplines.

The 1998 IEEE President, Dr. Bordogna is an IEEE Fellow who has been the recipient of awards from numerous organizations including the NSF, the American Society for Engineering Education, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, IEEE-USA, and IEEE. Dr. Bordogna is also a member of the Hall of Fame of the American Society for Engineering Education. He holds a bachelor’s and doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania and masters from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 
 

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2007 - Andrew S. Tanenbaum

photo of Andrew Tanenbaum

Andrew S. Tanenbaum has dedicated over three decades of his life to the task of educating generations of students in the field of computer science. Dr. Tanenbaum is best known as the creator of the open source Unix-like operating system called MINIX, which he created for use alongside his textbooks, and which was eventually used by Finnish university student Linus Torvalds to create the kernel, or central component, for the Linux operating system. Dr. Tanenbaum has also penned five textbooks, which collectively have been revised through 17 editions, and have been translated into over 20 languages. Those textbooks are considered standards in the field of computer science.

Though Dr. Tanenbaum moved to the Netherlands early in his career, he retained his American citizenship, and has maintained a key interest in American political affairs. He is well known for his endeavors on the World Wide Web, where under the pseudonym, The Votemaster, Dr. Tanenbaum created the popular Web site electoral-vote.com in 2004. One of the most widely used and cited Web sites during the 2004 U.S. Presidential election, it was drawing 700,000 visitors a day; electoral-vote.com remains popular today.

An IEEE Fellow and the recipient of numerous awards, Tanenbaum is also a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, and a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received his bachelor’s in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and his doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. He currently serves as a professor of computer science at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, and was formerly the scientific director of the Advanced School for Computing and Imaging (ASCI) for 12 years.

 
 

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2006 - Sanjit Mitra

photo of Sanjit Mitra

For more than four decades, Dr. Sanjit Mitra has been one of the most dedicated and innovative engineering educators, with an unceasing commitment to his electrical engineering students.

In the 1960’s, when he was an assistant professor at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, he created a course on the use of active analog filters as integrated circuits, one of only two such courses in the United States at that time. As a professor at the University of California at Davis, he restructured the junior-level course in analog electronic circuits, expanding it to cover integrated circuits for analog and digital electronics. He also added a novel laboratory component to the course and developed videotape self-instructions modules.

While a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California at Santa Barbara, he developed a MATLAB-based undergraduate course on digital signal processing complemented by an innovative laboratory section.

Subsequently, as chairman of the electrical and computer engineering department at Santa Barbara, he reorganized the department, recruited outstanding faculty, introduced new academic programs and strengthened interaction with industry.

Dr. Mitra has authored 12 books, 210 journal articles and more than 410 conference papers. An IEEE Life Fellow, he is a past president of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the International Society for Optical Engineering.

Dr. Mitra has received the Frederick Emmons Terman Award of the American Society for Engineering Education, an IEEE Third Millennium Medal and the McGraw-Hill/Jacob Millman Award of the IEEE Education Society.

 
 

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2005 - H. Vincent Poor

Dr. H. Vincent Poor, the George Van Ness Lothrop Professor in Engineering at Princeton University, is widely recognized as one of the world's leading educators and researchers in wireless communications, signal processing and related fields.

The 26 doctoral candidates he has supervised are a "Who's Who" of authorities in corporate and academic communications research.In 2002, he received the U.S. National Science Foundation's Director's Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars, the highest honor bestowed by NSF for excellence in teaching and research.He is also a member of the U. S. National Academy of Engineering and is a former Guggenheim Fellow.

Dr. Poor's graduate-level textbook,"An Introduction to Signal Detection and Estimation," is considered the definitive reference in this field. He has also developed an undergraduate survey course titled "The Wireless Revolution," which has been hailed as a model for bringing the technical, political, economic and social implications of wireless communications to a broad array of students in both engineering and the liberal arts.

In addition to his skills as an educator, Dr. Poor is acknowledged worldwide for his landmark research contributions to the fields of robust statistical signal processing,multi-user detection and non-Gaussian signal processing, which have opened new horizons in wireless communications and related fields. An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Poor has served as Division X Director on the IEEE Board of Directors, as president of the IEEE Information Theory Society and as a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Control Systems Society. He is currently the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory.

 
 

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2004 - Paul R. Gray

The executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California at Berkeley (UC Berkeley), Dr. Paul R. Gray has equipped a generation of integrated circuit designers to excel in industry and academia. His students have won numerous prizes, including four Best Paper Awards at the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference and IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems and IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits Best Paper Awards.

Since joining UC Berkeley's department of electrical engineering and computer sciences (EECS) in 1971, Dr. Gray has held a number of administrative posts, including department chairman from 1990 to 1993 and dean of engineering from 1996 to 2000. He helped redesign the EECS undergraduate curriculum, established a department of bioengineering and championed interdisciplinary initiatives in health science and nanotechnology.

Dr. Gray is the co-author of the widely used 1977 textbook 'Analysis and Design of Analog Integrated Circuits.' Expanded in successive editions, it remains the standard reference work for the field. He has co-edited two other texts, contributed to more than 130 papers and holds 13 U.S. patents.

An IEEE Fellow and member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Gray has served as editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits and as president of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Council (now the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society). He is a past member of the Engineering Dean's Council of the American Society for Engineering Education, and has received numerous awards including the IEEE W.R.G. Baker Prize Paper Award and the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Award.

 
 

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2003 - Yasuharu Suematsu

Yasuharu Suematsu's impact on the field of optical communication can be seen in the career successes of his students. In his more than 30-year tenure at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, he served as researcher, professor, dean and president. He has mentored more than 60 Ph.D. students, many leading highly distinguished careers in academia and industry.

Stressing real devices for practical applications, he forged cooperative relationships between the university and leading companies in the field. Professor Suematsu also championed the development of research centers for ultra-high-speed and quantum-effect electronics. His research achievements in optical communications include 1.5-mm lasers and single-mode lasers for high-capacity, long-wavelength optical fiber transmission.

Professor Suematsu has published 19 books and more than 260 papers detailing fundamental contributions to the field. His textbook, Introduction to Optical Fiber Communications, written with Kenichi Iga, has been translated into several languages and is a popular reference worldwide.

After leaving the Tokyo Institute in 1993, Professor Suematsu held leadership positions at the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Japan's National Institute for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research and Kochi University of Technology in Kochi, Japan. He is now director general of the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo.

An IEEE Life Fellow, Professor Suematsu has served as president of the Japan Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering; commissioner of the Space Activities Commission for the Prime Minister of Japan; and on numerous professional boards and associations. His honors include the IEEE Quantum Electronics Award, the IEEE David Sarnoff Award, the Vladimir Paulsen Gold Medal, Japan's Medal with Purple Ribbon, Eduard Rhein Basic Research Prize and many others.
 

 
 

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2002 - Petar V. Kokotovic

Dr. Petar V. Kokotovic’s impact as an educator is evident in the success of his students. The list of those he has mentored, many of whom are IEEE Fellows, reads like a worldwide “Who’s Who” of control engineers. His lively and dynamic style inspires innovation while instilling the value of using engineering to solve real problems.

Dr. Kokotovic is the founder and director of the University of California-Santa Barbara’s Center for Control Engineering and Computation. This center has become a role model of cross disciplinary research and education. One of the Center’s achievements is a fully integrated cross-disciplinary graduate program for electrical and computer, mechanical and environmental, and chemical engineering fields. While at the University of Illinois at Urbana, he pioneered singular perturbation techniques, used today in power systems and adaptive controllers.

At the University of California his group developed constructive nonlinear control methods and applied them, with colleagues from MIT, Caltech and United Technologies, to new jet engine designs. As a long-term industrial consultant, he has contributed to computer controls at Ford and to power system stability at General Electric. With his 30 Ph.D. students and 20 postdoctoral researchers, Dr. Kokotovic has co-authored numerous papers and 10 books.

He is an IEEE Fellow and a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. His honors include the IEEE Control Systems Field Award, the IF AC Quazza Medal, the D.C. Drucker Eminent Faculty Award and two Outstanding IEEE Transactions paper awards.

 
 

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2001 - Brian D.O. Anderson

As a professor, author, and educational innovator, Dr. Brian D.O. Anderson has been a driving force in electrical engineering education for over thirty years.

Chair of the department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Newcastle, Australia, from 1967 to 1982, Dr. Anderson worked to establish internationally prominent bachelor, master, and doctoral programs. In 1982, Dr. Anderson joined the Australian National University, where he established a highly regarded Department of Systems Engineering, the first engineering department of the University. Subsequently, he went on to establish a multi-department Research School of Information Science and Engineering.

Dr. Anderson’s colleagues laud him as an inspired, motivating teacher. He has taught at every level, from freshman to doctoral, and a number of his many Ph.D. students and post-doctoral fellows have gone on to become IEEE Fellows and Fellows of the Australian Academy of Technological Services and Engineering. His eight books, including Linear Optimal Control and Optimal Control: Linear Quadratic Methods, co-authored with J.B. Moore, have been widely adopted.

In the realm of educational policy, Dr. Anderson has served on the Australian Science and Technology Council and the Prime Minister’s Science and Engineering Council, among others, where he has worked to enhance electrical engineering education in Australia. He is currently President of the Australian Academy of Science, and from 1990 to 1993, he was President of the International Federation of Automatic Control.

Brian D.O. Anderson was born 15 January 1941, in Sydney, Australia. He received a B.Sc. degree in mathematics from Sydney University in 1962, and a B.E. in Electrical Engineering in 1964, also from Sydney University. He received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1966. Currently, Dr. Anderson is Director of the Research School of Information Sciences and Engineering at the Australian National University.

Dr. Anderson became an IEEE Fellow and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 1975, a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in 1980, and a Fellow of the Royal Society (London) in 1989. He has received many awards, including the Senior Award of the IEEE Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing Society, the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Guillemin-Cauer Prize and the IEEE Control Systems Society Bode Lecture Prize, and the IEEE Control Systems Award. He holds honorary doctorates from the Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium), the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, and the Universities of Melbourne and Sydney. 

 
 

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