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2013 - Stefano Galli, Anna Scaglione, and Zhifang Wang

Stefano Galli, Anna Scaglione, and Zhifang Wang

Stefano Galli, Anna Scaglione, and Zhifang Wang have authored what is considered the most complete review of power line communications (PLC) technology published to date, detailing its usage in the development of smart grids. The paper, which appeared in the June 2011 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE (vol. 99, no. 6, pp. 998–1027), has quickly become a key reference document for the application of PLC technology in smart grids. PLC involves sending and receiving data over the existing electrical wires of the power distribution grid. With the emergence of smart grids utilizing remote sensing, communication, control, monitoring, and analysis for more efficient power grid operation, PLC technology has the potential to play a larger role than traditional automatic meter reading. The paper details the complex role of communications within smart grids and provides readers with accurate information on the history of and latest advances in PLC methods to address the roles for which PLC may be best suited.

An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Galli is director of technology strategy with ASSIA, Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA. Dr. Scaglione is an IEEE Fellow and a professor with Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of California, Davis, CA, USA. Dr. Wang is an IEEE Senior Member and assistant professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

 
 

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2012 - Kannan M. Krishnan

Photo of 2012 IEEE Donald G. Fink Award recipient, Kannan M. Krishnan

“Biomedical Nanomagnetics: A Spin Through Possibilities in Imaging, Diagnostics and Therapy” by Kannan M. Krishnan provides a much-needed comprehensive treatment of biomagnetics detailing the advances and challenges in using magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications. The paper, which appeared in the July 2010 issue of the IEEE Transactions on Magnetics (vol. 46, no. 7, pp. 2523–2558), addresses targeted drug delivery for cancer treatment, novel contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, cancer therapy using magnetic hyperthermia, in vitro diagnostics based on magnetic nanoparticles, and the magnetic particle imaging technique. Dr. Krishnan presents the relevant physics of nanoscale magnetic particles and reviews their synthesis and characterization. He discusses the practical necessities for modifying particle surface chemistry to address in vivo applications while also conforming to U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. He also reviews the new imaging modality of magnetic particle imaging and puts it into context with other imaging methods. Dr. Krishnan has been one of the pioneers of magnetic particle imaging and optimizing the particles to provide the best contrast.

An IEEE Senior Member, Dr. Krishnan is currently a professor with the Department of Materials Science and Physics at the University of Washington, Seattle.

 
 

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2011 - Andreas F. Molisch, Larry J. Greenstein, and Mansoor Shafi

“Propagation Issues for Cognitive Radio” by Andreas F. Molisch, Larry J. Greenstein, and Mansoor Shafi, provides valuable information critical to the success of cognitive radio (CR), an important developing area of wireless communications. The paper, which appeared in the May 2009 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE (vol. 97, no. 5, pp. 787-804), covers the essentials of wireless propagation issues in a format suitable for CR researchers, providing access to information limited previously to propagation researchers. CR aims to improve spectral efficiency of licensed communications frequencies by using unlicensed radios that can recognize usage or nonusage at a given frequency and be allowed to transmit at that frequency during intervals of nonusage. The paper gains its accessibility through extensive use of intuitive descriptions and analogies, using equations sparingly but maintaining a rigorous presentation. Its importance lies in its ability to enable CR researchers to choose good channel models, which is key to demonstrating low interference of the radios to primary spectrum users.

An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Molisch is currently a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, where he heads the Wireless Devices and Systems (WiDeS) group.

An IEEE Life Fellow, Dr. Greenstein is currently a research associate with Rutgers University’s WINLAB, North Brunswick, NJ, collaborating on new aspects of wireless communications.

An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Shafi is currently a Telecom Fellow (Wireless) with Telecom New Zealand, Wellington, where he advises on future directions of wireless technologies and standards. He represents the New Zealand government in the meetings of the World Radio Conference and in the meetings of  ITU and APT relating to wireless and spectrum standards.

 
 

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2010 - John W. Arthur

John W. Arthur

John Arthur’s “The Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Theory Revisited” sheds new light on the most fundamental concepts of electromagnetic theory with a goal to eliminate much of the confusion, contradictions and incorrect physics associated with many of the approaches involving Maxwell’s equations currently in use.  The tutorial paper published in the February 2008 issue of IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, clearly, elegantly and thoroughly addresses issues affecting electromagnetism such as problems stemming from the original theory of magnetism and Maxwell’s equations. Dr. Arthur’s paper also deals with the puzzle concerning the many respects in which the magnetic field still appears to behave as if it originated from poles. In a unique way he illustrates that while Maxwell’s equations do not rule out the existence of magnetic poles, they provide a basis for magnetism that does not need poles.

An IEEE Senior Member, Dr. Arthur is currently an independent technical consultant and honorary fellow in the School of Engineering at the University of Edinburgh.

 
 

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2009 - Daniel J. Costello and G. David Forney

2009 Fink

Daniel J. Costello, Jr. and G. David Forney, Jr.’s “Channel Coding: The Road to Channel Capacity” traces the history of the field of channel coding and of progress towards reaching channel capacity. Channel capacity (or the “Shannon limit”) measures how fast information can be reliably transmitted over a communications channel. The paper by Costello and Forney details the efforts during the past 60 years to design codes and decoding schemes that could approach the Shannon limit, discussing the successes and failures of both algebraic coding techniques, which were the dominant techniques for several decades, and probabilistic coding techniques, which recently solved the problem of approaching the Shannon limit in practical systems. Both authors have been pioneers in the development of channel coding theory since the 1960s.

An IEEE Life Fellow, Dr. Costello has previously received the Humboldt Research Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Germany. Dr. Costello’s research interests are in the area of digital communications, with special emphasis on error control coding and coded modulation. He has numerous technical publications and co-authored a popular textbook in the field. He is currently the Leonard Bettex Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana.

An IEEE Life Fellow, Dr. Forney has received several awards including the IEEE Information Theory Society Claude E. Shannon Award and the IEEE Edison Medal. Dr. Forney’s career has spanned both the theory and the practical application of coding and information theory. He is currently an adjunct professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and is a member of the U. S. National Academy of Engineering and U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

 
 

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2008 - Yann Frauel, Thomas J. Naughton, Osamu Matoba, Enrique Tajahuerce, and Bahram Javidi

2008 Fink

Yann Frauel, Bahram Javidi, Osamu Matoba, Thomas J. Naughton, and Enrique Tajahuerce co-authored a comprehensive survey about the emerging field of computational holographic imaging and image processing of three-dimensional objects. These international and interdisciplinary researchers have come together to provide novel tools and techniques for the processing and analysis of digital holograms. The paper provides an overview of the basics of holographic sensing and imaging, as well as new emerging applications. It describes computational holographic imaging as technology with great potential in a variety of applications including 3D television displays, 3D medical imaging, information security and 3D measurements as well as manufacturing and virtual reality.    

Mr. Frauel teaches the post-graduate program in computer science and engineering at the Universitat Nacional Autonama de Mexico, and worked as a trainee engineer with the Atomic Energy Commission in France. He earned his master’s degree in optics from the École Supérieure d’Optique-SupOptique, Orsay, France and a doctorate in optics and photonics from the Institut d’Opticque-Université Paris XI, Orsay, France.

Mr. Javidi, an IEEE Fellow, is the Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at the University of Connecticut, Storrs. Javidi is a Fellow of six other professional societies; his research interests are in 3D optical imaging. He holds a bachelor’s degree from George Washington University, Washington, D.C., a master’s degree and doctorate from the Pennsylvania State University, all in electrical engineering.

Mr. Matoba is an associate professor in the department of computer and systems engineering at Kobe University, Kobe, Japan. His current research interests and expertise are in optical and digital processing of three-dimensional objects, terabyte holographic memory and optical security. He received his doctorate in applied physics from Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.

Mr. Naughton is a Marie Curie Fellow at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, and University of Oulu, Finland. He worked at Space Technology (Ireland) Ltd., and at the Department of Radio electronics at the Czech Technical University in Prague and University of Connecticut, Storrs. He received a bachelor’s degree with double honors in computer science and experimental physics from the National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

Mr. Tajahuerce is an associate professor at Universidad Jaume I, Castelló, Spain. He was a researcher at the Instituto Tecnológico de Óptica (AIDO) in Valencia, Spain and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at University of Connecticut, Storrs. He holds a bachelor’s degree and a doctorate in physics from the Universidad de Valencia in Valencia, Spain. 

 
 

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2007 - Michael Shur and Arturas Zukauskas

2007 Fink

Authors Michael S. Shur and Artūras Žukauskas’ discuss the benefits of solid-state lighting technologies in their paper entitled “Solid-State Lighting: Towards Superior Illumination.” The paper compares the approach of generating white light from solid-state phosphor LEDs by using multichip lamps comprised of colored LEDs. The tutorial paper is distinctive in that it describes a unique optimization algorithm and a report on the implementation of the versatile solid-state lamp, which utilizes a computer-controlled spectral power distribution. Under appropriate psychophysical verification, these lamps are expected to have a significant impact on the lighting industry and already have been used to treat seasonal affective disorder, sometimes referred to as “winter depression,” and to facilitate energy-efficient plant growth.

 Dr. Michael Shur is the Patricia W. and C. Sheldon Roberts Professor of Solid State Electronics in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. He received his master’s in electrical engineering in 1965 (with honors), from St. Petersburg Electrotechnical Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, and a Ph. D. (candidate) degree and Doctor of Physics and Mathematics degree from A.F. Ioffe Institute of Physics and Technology, St. Petersburg, in 1967 and 1992, respectively. Dr. Shur also serves as editor-in-chief of the International Journal of High Speed Electronics and Systems and editor-in-chief of a book series on “Special Topics in Electronics and Systems.” An IEEE Fellow, he is listed by the Institute of Scientific Information as a highly cited researcher.

 Dr. Žukauskas has been with Vilnius University, Lithuania since 1979, and currently serves as director and chief researcher at the Institute of Materials Science and Applied Research as well as a professor in the Department of Semiconductor Physics. Dr. Žukauskas is a member of the Lithuanian Physical Society and Lithuanian Materials Research Society and expert member of the Lithuanian Academy of Sciences. He holds one patent and has published 180 papers and a book. In 2002, he received a Lithuanian National Prize in Science. Dr. Žukauskas received a doctorate in semiconductor and dielectric physics in 1983 and a second degree, doctor habilitus of natural sciences in 1991, both from Vilnius University.

 
 

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2006 - Suhas N. Diggavi, Naofal Al-Dharir, Anastasios Stamoulis, and Robert Calderbank

2006 Fink

Wireless communication is transforming everyday life through ever more capable cellular networks and broadband wireless access. Future goals include data rates close to that of wired communications, real-time applications and hours of untethered service. The paper entitled “Great Expectations: The Value of Spatial Diversity in Wireless Networks”, which was published in February 2004 in Proceedings of the IEEE by Suhas N. Diggavi, Naofal Al-Dhahir, Anastasios Stamoulis and Robert Calderbank, is an important reference to experts in the wireless field.

The paper addresses the engineering challenges that exist in meeting these goals in the face of limits on spectrum, battery life and other resources. It captures the major advances made in the past decade and focuses on spatial diversity, a primary tool that can be leveraged at many levels, including the physical layer, and for multi-user networking protocols. In the physical layer, spatial diversity is captured through multiple transmit and receive antennas. After a decade of research and development, multiple antenna technologies are emerging in mainstream cellular and alternate broadband access standards. In wireless networks, multi-user spatial diversity has emerged as a powerful mechanism for enhancing the performance of data communication. The paper illustrates the benefits of spatial diversity across the networking layers, emphasizing the fundamental underlying principles. At an overall systems level, the impact of spatial diversity is expressed in terms of improvements to user experience in the application layer, to link reliability, spectral efficiency, and as a way to lower deployment and operating costs. This paper captures the value of spatial diversity to the cross-layer design of wireless networks, identifies the extent of current knowledge, and indicates future research directions.

Suhas Diggavi is a member of the faculty at the School of Computer and Communications Science of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in France, where he is director of the Laboratory for Information and Communications Systems. From 1998 to 2003, he was a principal member of the technical staff at the Information Science Center at the AT&T Shannon Laboratories in Florham Park, New Jersey. An IEEE member, Dr. Diggavi is a recipient of the Okawa Foundation Research Award and a co-recipient of the 2005 IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference Best Paper Award, along with Dr. Al-Dhahir and Dr. Calderbank.

An associate professor of electrical engineering at the University of Texas at Dallas, Naofal Al-Dhahir’s research interests include OFDM wireless networks, signal processing for communications, and digital subscriber line technology. He was a principal member of the technical staff at the AT&T Shannon Laboratory from 1999 to 2003, where he worked on space-time coding and signal processing. He co-authored “Doppler Applications for LEO Satellite Systems,” has written over 55 journal articles, and holds 11 U.S. patents. An IEEE Senior Member, Dr. Al-Dhahir is a member of the IEEE SP4COM and SPTM technical committees and an editor for IEEE Transactions on Communications. He is co-recipient of the 2005 IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing Best Young Author Paper Award.

A Member of IEEE, Anastasios Stamoulis has been with QUALCOMM, Inc. in San Diego, California since 2003. Previously he was a Senior Technical Staff Member at AT&T Labs-Research in Florham Park, New Jersey and a visiting assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of Minnesota in Twin Cities.

Robert Calderbank is professor of electrical engineering and mathematics at Princeton University in New Jersey, where he directs the program in applied and computational mathematics. He came to Princeton in 2004 from AT&T Labs, where he was Vice President for Research and responsible for the world’s first industrial research lab, primarily focused on data at scale. At AT&T, he was also responsible for innovations in a series of voiceband modem standards that moved communication practice close to the fundamental theoretical limits established by Shannon. An IEEE Fellow and a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, he is a former editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and a recipient of the IEEE Millennium Medal.  

 
 

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2005 - Oliver Brand, Christof Hagleitner, Andreas Hierleman, and Henry Baltes

Oliver Brand
Microfabrication processes for chemical and biochemical sensors hold the potential to produce one or thousands of devices of micrometer and millimeter dimensions. This ability to fabricate many of these devices in parallel leads to tremendous cost savings and enables the production of array structures or large device series with minute fabrication tolerances. The paper "Microfabrication Techniques for Chemical/Biosensors" published in the June 2003 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE by Henry Baltes, Oliver Brand, Christoph Hagleitner and Andreas Hierlemann will be a valued reference to those involved in microfabrication for the foreseeable future. Originally asked to describe how microfabrication technology applies to chemical microsensors, the authors exceeded all expectations by crafting a powerful review that describes, compares and contrasts the principal approaches to microsensor technology, identifies them with their appropriate microfabrication technologies, and provides wide-ranging examples of each from numerous research groups. The paper provides a sound outline of fundamental chemical sensor principles,a definitive review of the advantages and disadvantages of fabricating devices via IC fabrication technology, a description of various microfabrication process flows, and a look at monolithic, integrated chemical and biological microsensor systems.

Dr. Oliver Brand is an associate professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. His research interests are in the areas of CMOS-based microsystems, microsensors for physical, chemical and biological measurement, MEMS fabrication technologies, and microsystems packaging. His focus has been on the development of microsensors and microactuators using industrial IC processes in combination with post-processing micromachining steps. Previously, he was a lecturer and deputy director of the Physical Electronics Laboratory at ETH Zurich. A Senior Member of the IEEE, Dr. Brand is the co-author of three books and more than 100 publications in scientific journals and conference proceedings, and a co-editor of the book series "Advanced Micro and Nanosystems."

Christof Hagleitner
Microfabrication processes for chemical and biochemical sensors hold the potential to produce one or thousands of devices of micrometer and millimeter dimensions. This ability to fabricate many of these devices in parallel leads to tremendous cost savings and enables the production of array structures or large device series with minute fabrication tolerances. The paper "Microfabrication Techniques for Chemical/Biosensors" published in the June 2003 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE by Henry Baltes, Oliver Brand, Christoph Hagleitner and Andreas Hierlemann will be a valued reference to those involved in microfabrication for the foreseeable future. Originally asked to describe how microfabrication technology applies to chemical microsensors, the authors exceeded all expectations by crafting a powerful review that describes, compares and contrasts the principal approaches to microsensor technology, identifies them with their appropriate microfabrication technologies, and provides wide-ranging examples of each from numerous research groups. The paper provides a sound outline of fundamental chemical sensor principles,a definitive review of the advantages and disadvantages of fabricating devices via IC fabrication technology, a description of various microfabrication process flows, and a look at monolithic, integrated chemical and biological microsensor systems.

Dr. Christoph Hagleitner received his doctoral degree in electrical engineering at the age of 29 from ETH Zurich with a thesis on a CMOS single-chip gas detection system. He then headed the circuit-design group of the Physical Electronics Laboratory. During his doctoral work, he specialized in interface circuitry and system aspects of CMOS integrated micro- and nanosystems. His work focused on CMOS integrated probes for parallel imaging by atomic force microscopy and chemical sensors. Currently, he is a research staff member at the IBM Research Laboratory in Zurich working on the analog front-end design of a novel probe-storage device. Dr. Hagleitner is the author of more than 40 papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings.

Andreas Hierlemann
Microfabrication processes for chemical and biochemical sensors hold the potential to produce one or thousands of devices of micrometer and millimeter dimensions. This ability to fabricate many of these devices in parallel leads to tremendous cost savings and enables the production of array structures or large device series with minute fabrication tolerances. The paper "Microfabrication Techniques for Chemical/Biosensors" published in the June 2003 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE by Henry Baltes, Oliver Brand, Christoph Hagleitner and Andreas Hierlemann will be a valued reference to those involved in microfabrication for the foreseeable future. Originally asked to describe how microfabrication technology applies to chemical microsensors, the authors exceeded all expectations by crafting a powerful review that describes, compares and contrasts the principal approaches to microsensor technology, identifies them with their appropriate microfabrication technologies, and provides wide-ranging examples of each from numerous research groups. The paper provides a sound outline of fundamental chemical sensor principles,a definitive review of the advantages and disadvantages of fabricating devices via IC fabrication technology, a description of various microfabrication process flows, and a look at monolithic, integrated chemical and biological microsensor systems.

An associate professor of microsensorics in the Physics Department at ETH Zurich, Dr. Andreas Hierlemann has two primary areas of research. One is the development of CMOS chemical microsensor systems that, for example, can detect certain gases at trace level. His other research involves interfacing electrogenic cells to microelectronic chips and establishing bidirectional electrical communication between neurons and microelectronic chips. He has a doctoral degree in physical chemistry from the Eberhard-Karls University in Tübingen,Germany,and has held postdoctoral positions at Texas A&M University in College Station,Texas, and at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Henry Baltes
Microfabrication processes for chemical and biochemical sensors hold the potential to produce one or thousands of devices of micrometer and millimeter dimensions. This ability to fabricate many of these devices in parallel leads to tremendous cost savings and enables the production of array structures or large device series with minute fabrication tolerances. The paper "Microfabrication Techniques for Chemical/Biosensors" published in the June 2003 issue of the Proceedings of the IEEE by Henry Baltes, Oliver Brand, Christoph Hagleitner and Andreas Hierlemann will be a valued reference to those involved in microfabrication for the foreseeable future. Originally asked to describe how microfabrication technology applies to chemical microsensors, the authors exceeded all expectations by crafting a powerful review that describes, compares and contrasts the principal approaches to microsensor technology, identifies them with their appropriate microfabrication technologies, and provides wide-ranging examples of each from numerous research groups.The paper provides a sound outline of fundamental chemical sensor principles,a definitive review of the advantages and disadvantages of fabricating devices via IC fabrication technology, a description of various microfabrication process flows, and a look at monolithic, integrated chemical and biological microsensor systems.

Dr.Henry Baltes is an expert on silicon-based microsystems and is professor of physical electronics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, (ETH), in Zurich, Switzerland, and acting chairman of the new ETH Center of Biosystems Science and Engineering in Basel. A Fellow of the IEEE and member of the editorial board of the Proceedings of the IEEE, he is co-editor of two series of textbooks, "Advanced Micro and Nanosystems" and "Microtechnology and MEMS." A member of the Swiss Academy of Science, his honors include the Koerber European Science Award, the Wilhelm Exner Medal of the Austrian Trade Association and the Swiss Technology Award. He is the former program director of the Swiss National Priority Programfor power electronics, systems and information technology,was a co-founder and director of LSI Logic Corporation of Canada, and a co-founder of Sensirion in Zurich.

 
 

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2004 - Alan S. Willsky

"Multiresolution Markov Models for Signal and Image Processing" by Dr. Alan S. Willsky is a comprehensive overview of multi-resolution (MR) modeling. Describing a framework for processing signals and images, it provides a coherent description of MR methods, concepts, and applications.

An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Willsky has held leadership positions in the IEEE Control Systems Society, of which he is a Distinguished Member. His honors include the IEEE Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize Award and the American Society of Civil Engineers' Alfred Noble Prize. He is the author of two books, notably Signals and Systems (co-authored with Alan Oppenheim), and has published approximately 170 journal and 300 conference papers. Dr. Willsky is the Edwin Sibley Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he has taught since 1973, as well as a founder, board member and Chief Scientific Consultant of Alphatech, Inc. in Burlington, Massachusetts. 

 
 

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2003 - Sunil R. Das, Mansour H. Assaf, Emil M. Petriu, C. V. Ramamoorthy, and Wen-Ben Jone

Sunil R. Das
The next generation of integrated circuitry, featuring reconfigurability, selfrepair, fault-tolerance and self-manageability relies on chips that can effectively self-test. The paper "Fault Tolerant Systems Design in VLSI Using Data Compression Under Constraints of Failure Probabilities," published in the December 2001 issue of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement by Sunil R. Das, Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Mansour H. Assaf, Emil M. Petriu and Wen-Ben Jone is a powerful reference for professionals who develop these new chips. The paper offers a lucid case for the importance of response data compaction, as well as an extensive overview of the various built-in self-test (BIST) methods available.

Sunil R. Das has published extensively in areas including switching and automata theory, digital logic design, threshold logic, fault-tolerant computing, graph theory and microprogramming and microarchitecture. A Fellow of the IEEE, the Canadian Academy of Engineering and the Society for Design and Process Science, he is a member of numerous IEEE societies as well as the Association for Computing Machinery. His honors include the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Achievement Award and Meritorious Service Award, and he was named a Golden Core Member of the Society in 1998. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Ottawa's School of Information Technology and Engineering, in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Mansour H. Assaf
The next generation of integrated circuitry, featuring reconfigurability, selfrepair, fault-tolerance and self-manageability relies on chips that can effectively self-test. The paper "Fault Tolerant Systems Design in VLSI Using Data Compression Under Constraints of Failure Probabilities," published in the December 2001 issue of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement by Sunil R. Das, Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Mansour H. Assaf, Emil M. Petriu and Wen-Ben Jone is a powerful reference for professionals who develop these new chips. The paper offers a lucid case for the importance of response data compaction, as well as an extensive overview of the various built-in self-test (BIST) methods available.

A member of the IEEE and the Canadian Mathematical Society, Mansour H. Assaf's research interests include computer architecture, fault tolerant computing, system-on-chip testing and fault diagnosis in digital and analog systems. He is a research associate in the Sensing and Modeling Research Laboratory at the University of Ottawa, and pursuing a doctoral degree in electrical and computer engineering at the School of Information Technology and Engineering at the University.

Emil M. Petriu
The next generation of integrated circuitry, featuring reconfigurability, selfrepair, fault-tolerance and self-manageability relies on chips that can effectively self-test. The paper "Fault Tolerant Systems Design in VLSI Using Data Compression Under Constraints of Failure Probabilities," published in the December 2001 issue of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation an Measurement by Sunil R. Das, Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Mansour H. Assaf, Emil M. Petriu and Wen-Ben Jone is a powerful reference for professionals who develop these new chips. The paper offers a lucid case for the importance of response data compaction, as well as an extensive overview of the various built-in self-test (BIST) methods available.

University of Ottawa School of Information Technology and Engineering professor Emil M. Petriu has published 160 papers; co-authored two books, Modern Digital Measuring Techniques and 8080 Microprocessor in Applications; and received two patents. A pioneer of absolute position
measurement and object recognition techniques using pseudorandom encoding, Petriu is a Fellow of the IEEE, Canadian Academy of Engineering and the Engineering Institute of Canada. He also serves on technical committees of the IEEE Instrumentation and Measurement and IEEE Robotics and Automation societies.

C.V. Ramamoorthy
The next generation of integrated circuitry, featuring reconfigurability, selfrepair, fault-tolerance and self-manageability relies on chips that can effectively self-test. The paper "Fault Tolerant Systems Design in VLSI Using Data Compression Under Constraints of Failure Probabilities," published in the December 2001 issue of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement by Sunil R. Das, Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Mansour H. Assaf, Emil M. Petriu and Wen-Ben Jone is a powerful reference for professionals who develop these new chips. The paper offers a lucid case for the importance of response data compaction, as well as an extensive overview of the various built-in self-test (BIST) methods available.

For more than 30 years, Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy has made important contributions to software engineering, distributed and parallel computation and computer architecture, through his research, teaching and publications. He has mentored 73 doctoral students and has published more than 200 papers and co-edited three books: Handbook on Software Engineering, Pacific
Computer Communications, and Computers for AI Processing. A Life Fellow of the IEEE and a Fellow of the Society of Design and Process Science, he has served on numerous IEEE committees and received IEEE Centennial and IEEE Third Millennium Medals. He has received many major IEEE Computer Society Awards, including the Taylor Booth, Richard Merwin, and Hitachi-Kanai Awards. He has served on many advisory committees including those of the U.S. Army, Air Force and Navy; Los Alamos Labs; Lockheed Research; and IBM. He is Professor Emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley.

Wen-Ben Jone
The next generation of integrated circuitry, featuring reconfigurability, selfrepair, fault-tolerance and self-manageability relies on chips that can effectively self-test. The paper "Fault Tolerant Systems Design in VLSI Using Data Compression Under Constraints of Failure Probabilities," published in the December 2001 issue of IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement by Sunil R. Das, Chittoor V. Ramamoorthy, Mansour H. Assaf, Emil M. Petriu and Wen-Ben Jone is a powerful reference for professionals who develop these new chips. The paper offers a lucid case for the importance of response data compaction, as well as an extensive overview of the various built-in self-test (BIST) methods available.

A Senior Member of the IEEE, Wen-Ben Jone is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Science at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio. His honors include the Best Thesis Award from the Chinese Institute of Electrical Engineering. His research interests include VLSI design for testability, BIST, memory testing, MEMS testing and repair, and low-power circuit design. He has published more than 100 papers and holds one patent.

 
 

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2002 - Ted Painter and Andreas Spanias

Since compact discs first began to supplant vinyl records as the delivery mechanism for audio, the demand for high-quality digital audio at low bit rates has risen exponentially. Dr. Ted Painter and Professor Andreas Spanias have provided a comprehensive study of the most significant developments in audio coding in “Perceptual Coding of Digital Audio.” The paper, with its discussions of perceptual coding building blocks, research literature and standards, serves as a tutorial for the novice, as a reference for the experienced practitioner and as a bibliographic roadmap for the expert researcher. Containing more than 400 references, it has been widely cited by researchers and practitioners in fields ranging from software development to human auditory perception.

Dr. Painter is a software architect in the Handheld Computing Division of Intel Corporation in Hudson, Mass. He specializes in the development of high-performance multimedia software for next-generation portable and wireless computing devices. His primary research interests are in speech and audio signal processing, perceptual coding and psychoacoustics.

Andreas Spanias is a professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at Arizona State University, where he conducts research in adaptive signal processing and speech processing. An IEEE Senior Member, he has served in numerous capacities including as associate editor of the IEEE Transactions of Signal Processing, is currently associate editor of the IEEE Signal Processing Letters. He is a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Executive Committee and the Society's Board of Governors.

 
 

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