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Lunchtime Educational Sessions Survey

Key Findings:
Although the response rate was low, nearly every respondent indicated interest in some session. There was a clear indication of strong interest in certain topics (e.g., Goal Setting, Stress Management) and much less interest in others (e.g., College Cost Planning, Drug/Alcohol Training).

 
 

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IEEE History Center Wikipedia Survey

Key Findings:
Respondents were very familiar with Wikipedia (the free online encyclopedia that is collaboratively developed over the Internet by individuals around the world) and often read articles a few times per week. However, very few actually contribute to Wikipedia. Conversely, respondents were not at all familiar with the IEEE History Center and a very small percentage had visited the Virtual Museum more than once or twice in the past year. Respondents had very high overall use of the Internet, including Life Members.* If a Wikipedia for the IEEE History Center were to be created, more than half of all respondents indicated that they would be likely or very likely to use it. Only a small percentage of all respondents indicated that they would be very likely to contribute to such a Wikipedia.

*However, approximately one-third of Life Members do not have email addresses in the member database, and it is possible that those Life Members would reflect lower Internet use.

 
 

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TryEngineering.org Bulletin Board Focus Group

Key Findings:
Teachers rated the site very highly, although prior to participating in the BBFG (Bulletin Board Focus Group) they were not that familiar with all of the features of the site. Guidance counselors, parents, and students also rated the site quite positively, particularly the guidance counselors. High school students found the site to be very useful, particularly for people their own age but not for younger students. Overall, when users get to the site and use it, they are very happy with the content available.  Increasing visibility of the site will be the key issue. 
 

 
 

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Scitopia Bulletin Board Focus Group

Key Findings:
Participants requested more help searching, so adding more robust "Help" pages and a little search guidance on the search pages prior to going live were recommended. Suggestions for future enhancements included the ability to sort search results (sometimes called “faceted search”) as well as potential additional publishers to add to the site. 
 

 
 

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Young Professionals Use of IEEE.tv

Key Findings:
Very few respondents have watched IEEE.tv either because they are not aware of it or they have not taken the time to do so. Those who did watch IEEE.tv rated their experiences positively;  however, because the number of respondents in this group is small, care should be taken in generalizing these results to the IEEE membership as a whole. All respondents, whether or not they had watched IEEE.tv, were asked about the value of members-only programming.  While most were only slightly more likely to watch a program because it is for members only, the presence of members-only programming increased the value of IEEE membership for nearly half of respondents. Similarly, the existence of IEEE.tv, itself, was seen as a valuable member benefit by slightly more than half of respondents;  however, very few respondents are interested in paying for programs. 
 

 
 

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Articles in Context Focus Group

Key Findings:
Participants thought that the ability to search for equations and figures would be very useful. Participants gave mixed reviews of the usefulness of MashUps (that is, being able to collect parts of many articles and combine them into one document) but saw this (and other features such as tags) as being potentially very useful for workgroups in corporations by allowing them to share information and work collaboratively.

 
 

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Articles in Context Focus Group, part 2

Key Findings:
As in the first group, participants thought that the ability to search for equations and figures would be very useful. Participants again gave mixed reviews of the usefulness of MashUps (i.e., being able to collect parts of many articles and combine them into one document) but again saw this (and other features such as tags) as being potentially very useful for workgroups in corporations by allowing them to share information and work collaboratively.

 
 

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Online Promotional Library

Key Findings:
Image, size, and title were the most useful in searching for advertisements while code and provider were least useful. As for potential enhancements to the site, all of the suggested enhancements were seen as important, with the ability to search by keyword rating highest. Similarly, more than half of respondents were interested in all of the other types of promotions;  video/multimedia was rated the highest with nearly three-quarters expressing interest. Opinions were mixed regarding the value of the Featured Campaigns with an equal number of respondents rating it useful as rated it not useful.

 

 
 

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BMS Web Usability

Key Findings:
With a few minor exceptions, results were similar regardless of the location of the test.  On average, older participants in India were less “web-savvy” and, therefore, had more problems with the system, while participants in Hong Kong were the most adept and the most impatient with what they saw as avoidable problems. There are no single, show-stopping problems with “Join” or “Renew,” but there are a few issues that add up to a worry:  could people who are less committed to IEEE be turned off altogether? Additionally, users found that searching and browsing for products was more difficult than expected. 
 

 
 

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Member Digital Library Survey

Key Findings:
Not surprisingly, the greatest number of people would sign up for the MDL at the lowest price point with the most features.  However, the greatest revenue would likely occur at a higher price point. There is some evidence that adding another lower price point/small download package could bring in new subscribers. Additionally, the impact of expanding the number of subscribers to the MDL on society membership was explored;  it was determined that this should be minimal. 
 

 
 

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Conference No-Shows Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, approximately half of respondents thought that “no-shows” are a significant problem. While there were a variety of reasons why accepted authors did not attend, respondents believed that a substantial portion of no-shows were authors who wanted to have their papers accepted and published but never planned on attending the conference.

 
 

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Conference Services Survey

Key Findings:
Additional support in the area of proceedings management was a top need, particularly for those who have only worked on one conference, followed by finance, paper management, and registration management support. A substantial majority would be interested in a tool or suite of tools to enable them to manage their conferences independently.  In choosing a tool, responsiveness, cost, and functionality were most important; whether or not it is provided by IEEE was less important.  However, for future conferences, a dedicated IEEE Conference Services resource was seen as potentially valuable. Although few had direct experience with conferences that use web-based tools such as podcasts, the vast majority of respondents see online tools (such as On-Site/Online Access to Technical Programs and Papers) as important to future conferences.

 
 

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Meeting Series Survey

Key Findings:
Approximately one-third of respondents thought that the meeting schedule required no changes, and only a little over one-quarter see it as important or very important to change. The length of the meeting is clearly an important issue:  respondents feel that some portion of the work could be done in a format other than a face-to-face meeting, although it is not clear that they believe that portion is significant.  However, the majority did indicate that less than half of their committee activities needed to be in conjunction with the Board Series. In addition, according to open-ended comments, issues other than logistics (for example, more substantial issues regarding volunteer work) seem to significantly affect respondents’ feelings about IEEE meetings.

 

 
 

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Psychology of Choice Presentation

Key Findings:
When people are presented with too many choices, they can be overwhelmed and decide not to make any choice at all. How choices are framed can have a significant effect and make it easier for individuals to make decisions.

 
 

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Consultants Fee Survey

Key Findings:
A majority of respondents are independent consultants who work out of their homes. Less than one-third of respondents carry professional liability insurance. Very few respondents indicated that they get clients through IEEE directories or databases;  most of their work is generated from repeat business and referrals from clients and friends.

 
 

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Computer Society Member Survey

Key Findings
Overall, the IEEE Computer Society succeeds in meeting the needs of most of its members. Respondents rated the Society favorably on measures of overall satisfaction, renewal likelihood, likelihood of recommending and membership being a good value. However, there is also a sizable minority apparently at some risk of defection, brought into focus by an Affinity scale constructed from the four measures above. This scale was used to compare two groups of members, "Backers," who are enthusiastic, satisfied Computer Society members seeing significant value in membership and happy to recommend it to others, and "Balkers," those who are most likely to let membership lapse and/or discourage others from joining. A key concern for Balkers is membership value, among all members indicating something less than “definitely will renew,” indicated "I do not experience enough benefit to justify the cost."  Finding ways to improve the cost/benefit ratio for Balkers appears to be crucial.

 
 

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PES General Meeting Survey

Key Findings
Overall, respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with the meeting, up very slightly from last year. Similar to last year, respondents saw the panel sessions as most valuable, followed by the paper sessions. The Super Sessions were also generally seen as valuable with more than two-thirds indicating that these were valuable or very valuable, more than the tutorials or poster sessions. Even though poster sessions were not most frequently seen as valuable or very valuable, these sessions are still clearly important. The relationship between the perceived value of each type of session and overall satisfaction with the General Meeting was strongest for the poster sessions. Scheduling conflicts during the meeting could be one source of dissatisfaction: more than half of respondents attend both technical sessions and committee meetings, and less than one-quarter of respondents disagreed with the idea of having the technical sessions and committee meetings on different days. On the other hand, three-fifths of respondents did not object to overlapping content, but this may be due to their focus more on the technical content of the conference.

 
 

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PES Editors Survey

Key Findings:
Most respondents are assigning reviewers once a week on average, prompted either by an email alert or by a visit to Manuscript Central. Respondents indicated that delays in assigning reviewers are primarily due to the fact that they are simply too busy. Nonetheless, there was no significant support for routine assistance with the assignment of reviewers.  Respondents largely do not find the system for selecting reviewers to be confusing, but they did note that the information about reviewers could be improved and that the number of qualified reviewers could be increased. By a slight majority the editors are not interested in a system that would automatically assign and notify reviewers when a manuscript revision is submitted.

 
 

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C37.2 Function Numbers Survey

Key Findings:
The seven device numbers (10, 22, 35, 58, 70, 82, 93) varied considerably on whether or not respondents thought they should be kept, ranging from Device 70 which less than half thought should "definitely" or "probably" be kept to Device 22 which less than one-tenth rated likewise. A large quantity of open-ended feedback was also obtained, particularly about the numbering system used for the standard.

 
 

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What Do We Know About Members?

Key Findings:
Overall, members maintain their membership for many reasons with no single benefit appealing to all members and all benefits seen as not valuable by some members. Retention rates are significantly lower among student members, while the retention rate for higher grade members is relatively stable and above the norms for associations. Those that are less tied to IEEE tend to be younger, in industry as opposed to academia, and have a bachelors degree as their highest degree. 

 
 

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Strategy Pulse Panel Survey

Key Findings:
Of the eight core values, respondents saw IEEE's efforts in the areas of Intellectual Activity and Growth and Nurturing of the Profession as important, and they were satisfied with the efforts in those areas.  The areas of Professionalism and Service to Humanity were also seen as important, but respondents were significantly less satisfied with IEEE's performance in these two areas.  Nearly three-quarters of respondents indicated that it was important for these strategic planning efforts to succeed.  A majority of respondents wanted to be kept updated about IEEE strategic planning efforts.

 
 

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Pulse Survey on Career Advice

Key Findings:
According to respondents, IEEE is not a significant source of career advice beyond information posted on our websites.  When it comes to web-based communities, networking, and face-to-face meetings, other organizations or sources were much more commonly used. Additionally, while most respondents indicated that they participate in continuing education to improve their skills for their current positions or for future positions, even more indicated that they did so for their own self-improvement.

 
 

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Mississippi Section Survey

Key Findings:
The results of this survey of Mississippi Section members were quite similar to results from other section surveys as well as surveys of the entire IEEE membership.  For example, staying current in the profession and accessing technical content are clearly important reasons for being an IEEE member, no matter where one lives. As for specific Mississippi Section activities, technical meetings, workshops/seminars, and tutorials/courses were seen as most valuable while social functions were by far seen as least valuable. In addition, more than half of respondents indicated that they would be willing to volunteer in some way to help with Section activities and provided their contact information to that end.

 
 

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What’s New @ IEEE Newsletter Survey

Key Findings:
About half of respondents read at least 3 out of 4 Newsletters they receive and seem generally satisfied with the Newsletters.  Across all Newsletters, respondents value the technology news most and career advice and information about member benefits least. In terms of potential changes, there is no consensus regarding individual versus combined Newsletters, but if there were to be a change in length, respondents would prefer shorter (as opposed to longer) Newsletters.

 
 

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IEEE Continuing Education Bulletin Board Focus Group

Key Findings:
Participants identified specific attributes of continuing education including: focused education—usually self-directed and self-motivated—for a specific, applied purpose; a systematic and sustained effort that builds on previous skills and knowledge; and materials that can serve as future reference sources. Continuing education is not necessarily formal education; participants also classify on-the-job learning and problem-solving as continuing education. In particular, publications—both electronic and print—are used not just to research a particular topic and to get information to solve problems at work but are also used as an important part of their overall continuing education and their efforts to keep up-to-date and to sharpen skills. Even general interest, technology publications such as Spectrum are considered part of their continuing education by some participants. Given the value that participants placed on printed and electronic publications, live opportunities for continuing education may need to offer components that take the educational experience beyond what can be achieved by reading an article or book. There is a great deal of sensitivity to added-fee member services: programs must have demonstrable value for many members to be willing to pay for them. When IEEE members request more “continuing education opportunities,” participants suggested that they are really asking for learning opportunities within their interest or specialty areas, a clear statement of “what’s in it for me” for different learning opportunities, and on-demand, easy-to-access opportunities that include the most cutting-edge and current information. Familiarity with IEEE continuing education resources was quite low. Despite their lack of familiarity with IEEE continuing education resources, most participants rate their satisfaction with IEEE as a resource quite high. The disappointments that members did have with IEEE seemed largely to be based on their ability to access resources. IEEE Expert Now was very well received by the participants, although they again expressed sensitivity to paying extra for this service.

 

 

 
 

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Strategic Research Annual Report 2013

The IEEE Strategic Research Annual Report 2013 (PDF, 399 KB) summarizes research findings from over 55 IEEE Strategic Research and Planning studies completed in 2013.

Please contact Marc Beebe to receive more information on the studies in the report.