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IEEE Sensors Conference Survey

Key Findings:
Nearly two-thirds of respondents were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the conference, and close to three-quarters indicated that the content of the conference was relevant to them.

The most frequently cited reason for attending Sensors 2008 was to gain new technical knowledge (selected by nearly four-fifths of respondents), followed by making a presentation (two-thirds) and networking with other professionals (just under three-fifths). 

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of attendees presented papers or tutorials, and the vast majority (80%) of these indicated that it was Useful or Very Useful to present.  However, two-thirds (67%) of participants would not have attended the conference were they not presenting.  Cost and lack of funding are the primary reasons why they would not have attended without presenting.  For more than three-quarters (77%) of participants, attendance costs were paid by their employers. 

More than two-thirds (69%) of attendees are Likely or Very Likely to present at a future Sensors conference, although far fewer than half (38%) plan to attend Sensors 2009 in Christchurch, New Zealand.
 

 
 
 

IEEE Computer Society Pricing Study

Key Findings:
Lowering the IEEE Computer Society Affiliate membership price to US$99 had a very large positive impact on the percentage of respondents who preferred the IEEE Computer Society (CS)to the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Moreover, adding new membership features, particularly targeted email, newsletters and expanded audio and video programming, further increased the number of respondents who would choose the Computer Society. Based upon this research, the Computer Society Board of Governors voted to decrease the CS Affiliate membership price to US$99.

 
 

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Monster Job Fair Survey

Key Findings:
Hiring managers are largely satisfied with the recruitment process, although the background check procedure remains a mystery to some. Hardly any of the hiring managers are aware of the recruitment process web page, and all indicated that they very infrequently visit the IEEE Employee Handbook in Employease. Job applicants are, on average, satisfied with the recruitment process. The actual interviewing procedure is the least satisfying part of the experience.

 
 

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IEEE Board of Directors Orientation Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, there is moderate satisfaction with the orientation, with slightly less than half of respondents indicating that they are less than satisfied. Most participants felt that the length of the orientation is appropriate. The presentation seen as most useful is that on Fiduciary Responsibilities, rated Very Useful by two-thirds of respondents. Overall, approximately half of respondents thought that the right amount of information is provided for each topic; however, for most topics, nearly as many respondents felt that too much information is provided as felt that too little information is provided. Exceptions to this finding are the budget development process with nearly a quarter of respondents indicating that much too little information is provided and Director Resources with slightly more than a quarter of respondents again indicating that too little information is provided. The top areas in which half or more of respondents want additional information are resources available to assist with their duties and Time Management/BoD member calendar.

 
 

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58th Annual IEEE Broadcast Symposium Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, attendees were very pleased with the Symposium with nearly 90% of respondents indicating that they were Satisfied or Very Satisfied; just under three-quarters rated the value of the conference High or Very High; and just over three-quarters found the content Relevant or Very Relevant. By far, the most common reasons cited for attending the Symposium are to network with other technology professionals and to gain new technical knowledge; these reasons are followed by “to support the Broadcast Technology Society,” cited by fewer than 50% of respondents. Respondents also indicated that the Symposium largely fulfilled these expectations, with more than 90% reporting so for networking and more than 80% reporting so for gaining new technical knowledge. One-third of respondents were presenters, and more than 90% of these respondents found it useful to present. However, more than 40% of presenters indicated that they would not have attended the Symposium were they not presenting.

 
 

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Concentration Banking Survey

Key Findings:
72% of respondents serve as treasurer for a geographic unit, with the remaining 28% as conference treasurers. Concentration Banking customers are generally very satisfied with IEEE’s services; fewer than 5% of respondents are less than satisfied with any aspect of the service. Respondents are most satisfied with the accuracy of account activity, with 60% of respondents being Highly Satisfied. IEEE’s Concentration Banking staff also receive good marks for overall service level -- from professionalism, to prompt responses to inquiries, to their knowledge exhibited.

 
 

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Sections Congress Survey

Key Findings:
Overall satisfaction with Sections Congress was very positive. Between 80% and 95% of respondents indicated that each of the stated growth opportunities (i.e., learn new information about IEEE, engage and build relationships with other volunteers, and have a voice in ideas, issues, and recommendations) are Important or Very Important. Respondents also reported that they were highly satisfied with their experiences in each of these areas, although the satisfaction level for “have a voice…,” while still high, was lower than that for the other two areas with approximately one-quarter of respondents indicating that they were less than satisfied with their experiences in ”have a voice....” Respondents stated that their sections are currently doing slightly better at providing a professional home (average score of 3.7 on a 5-point scale) than they are at engaging members (3.4) or recognizing member needs at each life cycle stage (3.3). The majority of respondents also indicated that they are Prepared or Well-Prepared to manage all of these issues in the future.

 
 

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Standards Education Survey

Key Findings:
Although approximately three-fifths of respondents indicated that they are Aware or Very Aware of technical standards, more than four-fifths state that technical standards are important in their field and more than three-quarters report that IEEE standards are used. Most respondents first learn about standards early in their careers, either in school or in their first two years on the job; they learn how to apply standards by working on a project that requires standards knowledge. The most frequently cited resources for learning about standards are the technical standards specifications, followed by on-the-job training.

 
 

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IEEE Women in Engineering Boston Section Survey

Key Findings:
In this study, current Boston-area Women in Engineering (WIE) members as well as female members of the IEEE Boston section were asked about their interest in participating in Boston-area WIE activities. Slightly under half (44%) of respondents are interested in participating in at least one Boston-area WIE activity, with 15% interested in volunteering to help plan such activities. In choosing activities, respondents indicated that the key deciding factors are relevance and interest of topic, followed by location of the event. The specific types of activities of most interest are technical tours and talks and professional development activities.

 
 

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IEEE GOLD Summit Evaluation

Key Findings:
One-half of the respondents were extremely satisfied with the Summit and found that it met their expectations for the amount of ideas exchanged and the opportunities to network with other GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) colleagues. Over 75% of respondents attended both days of the Summit, again finding it extremely valuable to network with other GOLD members. More than 50% of respondents plan to implement activities learned from others at the Summit. The breakout sessions on Thursday were well received with more than half of the attendees stating that the IEEE STEP program will be implemented in their region. Slightly less than half felt that STEP would be valuable in their region.

 
 

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IEEE eXpress Conference Publishing Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, respondents hold a very positive view of eXpress Conference Publishing with 13 out of 15 respondents reported that they are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with eXpress Conference Publishing, with only one person indicating dissatisfaction. Similarly, the majority of respondents (10 out of 15) rated their likelihood to recommend eXpress Conference Publishing to a colleague. The importance of customers’ willingness to recommend the service is further underscored by the fact that half of the respondents first became aware of eXpress Conference Publishing through recommendations from colleagues.

 
 

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IEEE PELS Election

Key Findings:
To tally the election results for VP-Meetings and VP-Operations using the survey software tool, members of the PELS (Power Electronics Society) Administrative Committee received invitations to vote for two offices. Ralph Kennel was elected VP-Meetings and F. Dong Tan was elected VP-Operations.

 

 
 

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IEEE.tv Graduate Student and GOLD Survey

Key Findings:
Only 6.4% of respondents are Familiar or Very Familiar with IEEE.tv, although 14% have watched at least one IEEE.tv program, up from 8% in 2007. The majority (59%) of respondents indicated that they are not watching because they were not aware of IEEE.tv, a figure down slightly from 2007. Overall, more than half of respondents indicated that the availability of IEEE.tv increases the value of their membership. Of those who have watched IEEE.tv programming, approximately two-thirds thought that the program length was about right and just over half thought that the level of detail was about right. Those who indicated that the length or detail level was not right were close to evenly split between wanting more and wanting less of these attributes. These results are similar to those of 2007. There is insufficient data for individual programs to analyze the results by program. Respondents are, on average, frequent users of the Internet and frequent watchers of Internet video programming.

 
 

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IEEE Electron Devices Society Member Survey

Key Findings
Electron Devices Society (EDS) members are largely satisfied with the Society -- 83% of respondents indicated satisfaction, including 17% who indicated that they are Highly Satisfied. Only 1% of members reported any level of dissatisfaction. Approximately 16% of respondents are more ambivalent about their memberships, indicating that they are less than satisfied but not dissatisfied. Almost half (49%) of EDS members consider another IEEE technical Society or IEEE (the Institute itself) to be their primary scientific/technical association, while 37% consider IEEE EDS to be their primary society. More than half (54%) of members and 37% of nonmembers consider EDS to be their "technical hub" (i.e., their primary source to find comprehensive information in their technical areas of interest). Furthermore, 70% of members and 47% of nonmembers stated that EDS should be such a technical hub for them. This desire for an EDS technical hub is significantly greater than the current incidence of EDS as such a hub, suggesting an area of potential growth for the Society. Benefits considered to be most important are those related to helping members stay current, providing access to information, providing solutions, and providing opportunities to publish/present.

 
 

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IEEE Vehicular Technology Society Member Survey

Key Findings:
The primary technical interest for the majority (58%) of respondents is mobile and portable communications, followed by vehicle technology (22%) and land transportation (12%). Vehicle technology is the most frequently cited secondary interest of respondents (36%). Most respondents (82%) indicated that remaining technically current (82%) is their primary reason for joining/maintaining their memberships in the Vehicular Technology Society (VTS). Only one other reason was chosen by at least half of respondents: being part of the premiere professional society for my profession (50%). Reasons related to discounts and volunteer/leadership opportunities are among the least popular. Few respondents are active in their local VTS chapters, with 57% indicating that they never participate. Only 18% reported at least occasionally participating, including 3% who consider themselves to be very active.

 
 

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IEEE Nonrenewing Member Survey

Key Findings:
There is no single reason why members join IEEE, and there is no single reason for nonrenewal of their memberships: respondents indicated an average of 3 reasons for membership nonrenewal. However, most respondents originally joined in order to advance their careers, and most did not renew membership due to cost issues. Membership value appears to be less important than cost. High membership cost is the top concern of the majority of respondents, regardless of how much they value membership benefits. Further, 25% of respondents reported that they would not miss any membership benefits. The most-used and most-valued IEEE membership benefit by far is IEEE Spectrum. Society memberships have declined significantly since 2005 and are considerably less valued in 2008 with more than three-quarters of respondents reporting that their Society membership had no impact on their decision not to renew their IEEE membership, a 21% increase from 2005. Less than one-third of respondents thought it Very Likely that they would rejoin IEEE within the next three years. However, a significant number of respondents would reconsider renewing membership if dues were reduced or if a cheaper, less comprehensive membership level were available; many of these members have retired or changed careers but wish to retain a connection to the engineering field.

 
 

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IEEE-USA Unemployment Survey

Key Findings:
More than one-third of respondents indicated that they remain unemployed. One-third of respondents indicated that they were laid off from their most recent position, with about half of those indicating that downturn in business was the primary reason for this. The vast majority (more than 80%) would like to stay in their primary area of technical competence.
Nearly two-thirds (65%) were not aware of IEEE-USA’s employment assistance services.

 
 

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IEEE-USA Non-Compete Agreements Survey

Key Findings:
Just over one half (53%) of respondents indicated that they have been asked to sign a non-compete agreement in the prior ten years. More than 90% of those asked to sign a non-compete agreement did so. Of those who are no longer working at the company that requested the non-compete agreement, nearly one-quarter did not interview with or declined offers from competitors because of the agreement. Nearly one-quarter indicated that, in their opinion, the non-compete agreement reduced their ability to use their professional skills.

 
 

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IEEE LEOS Member and Naming Survey

Key Findings:
“Photonics Society” was clearly preferred over “LEOS” by both members and nonmembers with 75% of members and 75% nonmembers indicating that “Photonics Society,” not “LEOS,” best represents the activities of the Society. More than 80% of respondents also stated that “Photonics Society” Well or Very Well represents their work compared to approximately 50% for “LEOS.” 75% of respondents felt that “Photonics Society” would be much better understood by those not working in the immediate field than would “LEOS” (less than 25% felt the reverse). A majority (60%) of members indicated that a name change would have no effect on their likelihood to renew, but those who said it would have an effect were almost uniformly positive: nearly 40% of members indicated that the name change would make them more likely to renew, while only 1% said the change would make them less likely. Nonmembers had a similar, though less dramatic response, with approximately 30% indicating that the name change would make them more likely to join/rejoin and less than 15% stating that they would be less likely. Overall satisfaction with LEOS is relatively high with approximately three-quarters of members indicating that they are Satisfied or Highly Satisfied; only 3% reported that they are dissatisfied. The two most important aspects of Society membership are “Free electronic access to PTL, JQE, JSTQE, and the IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology” and “Helps me stay current on technical developments.”

 
 

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125th Anniversary Survey

Key Findings:
The majority (nearly 70%) of Section and Student Branch leaders were not aware that 2009 was the 125th Anniversary of IEEE. In order to promote activities around the Anniversary, the leaders indicated that the most useful items would be an IEEE information flyer of interesting facts, milestones, timelines, to distribute to members; customizable marketing templates for flyers and banners; sample media as well as IEEE fact sheets for leaders' reference.  Assuming they had the resources to assist them in planning, approximately two-thirds of respondents indicated that they were Likely or Very Likely to hold some event celebrating the Anniversary, with the most likely type of event being a seminar or speaker.


 
 

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IEEE Career and Workforce Study

Key Findings:
More than one-third of respondents plan to work as consultants when they retire, and approximately 25% of respondents said they plan to work—or specifically, teach—part time,
with only about 10% percent of respondents indicating they did not plan to work for pay at all after retirement. For the majority of respondents, the intention to continue working is based on a desire to remain mentally or physically active rather than on financial considerations. In terms of choosing where to work late-career, opportunities to do interesting work and to learn new things are seen as the most important factors.

 
 

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IEEE Alternative Membership Research

Key Findings:
A tiered membership model will be positively received.  Relative to the current model and a point-allocation model, more members and nonmembers indicated that they like a tiered membership model: 46% of Higher Grade and 45% of Graduate Student members have a positive opinion of the tiered membership model, while only 34% of Higher Grade and 40% of Graduate Student members have a similar opinion of the current model. Nonmembers are also more likely to have a positive opinion of the tiered membership model (28%) than of the current model (11%). Interest in signing up for IEEE membership also appears higher under the tiered structure.  Higher Grade:  97% selected at least one tier versus 78% for the current and 73% for the point-allocation models.  Graduate Students:  92% selected at least one tier versus 51% for the current and 65% for the point-allocation models
Nonmembers:  55% selected at least one tier versus 8% for the current and 28% for the point-allocation models A key benefit to utilize in designing Membership Tiers 2 and 3 is 25 article downloads;  the impact is particularly strong for Graduate Students in Tier 2: •    For Higher Grade members, Tier 2 grows modestly when 25 downloads are offered by drawing nearly equally from Tier 1, Tier 3, and those who would otherwise not sign up.  The take rate for Graduate Students, however, rises substantially and half of the growth comes from those who would otherwise not sign up.  Higher Grade members are also slightly more likely to sign up for Tier 3 if 25 downloads are offered, drawing equally from Tier 2 and those who would not otherwise sign up.  Graduate Students, who are unlikely to sign up for Tier 3 overall, are unaffected by adding this benefit to Tier 3.

 
 

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ASAE Economic Conditions Survey

Key Findings:
IEEE joined with ASAE (American Society of Association Executives) and 96 other associations to conduct this research. Respondents are optimistic with only 8% indicating their employment situation will be worse next year, nearly 20% think it will be better, while 73% say it will stay about the same.  Those respondents with a more pessimistic outlook tend to value their association less. For membership, the big concern may be members' behavior if employers stop paying their dues as nearly half will drop their memberships. A second area at risk is conferences where respondents indicated they are likely to attend fewer meetings and conferences in the coming year. When asked if they planned to drop their membership in one or more professional organizations, 6.7% of IEEE respondents indicated that they would do so;  however, only 2.8% indicated that they would drop their IEEE membership.

 
 

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Financial Advantage Products Insurance Survey

Key Findings:
Even if the group pricing were competitive, significantly more than three-quarters of respondents would not consider purchasing an insurance product from IEEE.  Generally, respondents indicated that they have all the insurance they need, that IEEE's proposal is too expensive, and that the product does not warrant the expense.  Respondents (75%) indicated that none of the benefits in the proposed new insurance product would be of interest.

 
 

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New York Section Survey

Key Findings:
As found in previous IEEE membership research studies, the primary reason New York Section members joined IEEE is access to technical content, while the least important reason is volunteering opportunities. However, the 12% of respondents who rated volunteering opportunities as Very Important were most likely to be satisfied with their IEEE membership, and when these respondents were asked to volunteer to assist the New York Section, nearly half agreed. Respondents rated Section activities related to keeping technically current (that is, technical meetings, tutorials/courses, and workshops/seminars) as most valuable. Seen as less valuable are telephone seminars and social functions.

 
 

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Spectrum Online Web Survey

Key Findings:
Respondents to this survey commented on the IEEE Spectrum Online website. Data was gathered from those who clicked on a banner ad on the website. However, nearly three-quarters of respondents reported that they read the print version of Spectrum. In terms of specific features for Spectrum Online, respondents are most interested in Spectrum print magazine content, distantly followed by wikis on specific technology and product reviews. They are least interested in blogs and podcasts. A number of respondents expressed an interest in being able to download PDF versions of entire issues of Spectrum. In general, respondents made very positive statements in the open-ended comments. On average, respondents were considerably younger and had lower incomes than the average IEEE member: nearly half were under age 30 and had incomes lower than $25,000. It is likely that many of the respondents were students, although this supposition cannot be verified as the question was not asked. 

 
 

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Academic Members’ Needs Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, approximately three-quarters of respondents are Satisfied or Very satisfied with IEEE’s efforts to serve the higher education community; very few (less than 4%) indicated that they are dissatisfied. Similar to previous surveys of all IEEE members, academic members’ most frequently selected reasons for maintaining membership with IEEE are to obtain IEEE publications and to remain technically current, both selected by approximately three-fifths of respondents. In addition, however, slightly more than half of respondents also want to join IEEE societies, and just under half remain members to enhance their stature within the profession. As for current involvement with IEEE, more than four-fifths (84%) of respondents read IEEE content (such as publications, proceedings, or standards). When asked to indicate their primary association or society, approximately half of respondents indicated IEEE and about one-quarter indicated an individual IEEE society. No other association or society was selected by more than 5% of respondents.

 
 

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Web Publishers Survey

Key Findings:
Respondents to this survey were staff members responsible for web content, just under half of whom attend the Forum every month or most months. (Note that results may be skewed toward the views of regular Forum attendees because less frequent attendees may also be less likely to respond to the survey). For the 21 respondents who had not attended the Forum, the most common reason for not attending is scheduling conflicts. Approximately half of respondents have downloaded the meeting notes, while 20% indicated that they did not know that notes were available.  Overall, the vast majority (83%) of respondents judged the amount of content presented to be just right, although nearly 40% complained that the duration of the meetings is too long. In terms of specific content, the most commonly requested items are technical tips.

 
 

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IEEE Job Fair Survey

Key Findings:
For applicants, responses were very favorable, overall. Most applicants reported that they were treated professionally (85%) and that IEEE is an organization for which they would like to work (83%), with approximately two-thirds of applicants Familiar or Very Familiar with IEEE prior to the job fair.  For managers, responses were favorable in that hiring managers spoke with several qualified job candidates as well as pursuing them for interviews.  All hiring managers agreed that they would attend another IEEE Job Fair.

 
 

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Strategic Research Annual Report 2013

The IEEE Strategic Research Annual Report 2013 (PDF, 399 KB) summarizes research findings from over 55 IEEE Strategic Research and Planning studies completed in 2013.

Please contact Marc Beebe to receive more information on the studies in the report.