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Job Site Employer Survey

Key Findings:
About half (52.3%) of responding employers indicated that they were somewhat or very satisfied with the IEEE Job Site. About a third (35.5%) indicated that the Job Site has been somewhat or very successful with providing qualified candidates. As for specific elements of the site, satisfaction was highest with ease of job posting (36.8% satisfied or extremely satisfied) and least satisfied with cost of posting jobs (17.7% satisfied or extremely satisfied).

Similar to the Job Site Candidate survey, when asked how they originally found out about the Job Site, no one source predominated. The most commonly indicated items were a friend or colleague (33.0%), followed by Spectrum Magazine (12.8%) and ieee.org (11.7%).

When asked to rate the quality of candidates sourced from different resources, Business Contacts/Networking was rated highest, with more than a third (34.8%) indicating that candidates sourced this way where of highest quality.

Half of respondents (51.7%) indicated that they are using social networking to source candidates, with the most frequent site being LinkedIn (70.5%), distantly followed by Facebook (43.2%).

 
 

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Job Site Candidate Survey

Key Findings:
Only a quarter (25.0%) of respondents indicated they were satisfied or very satisfied with the Job Site. When asked about specific features, the greatest proportion of respondents indicated satisfaction job alerts (45.3% somewhat or very satisfied). However, more than a quarter indicated that they were somewhat or very dissatisfied with both Job Alerts (26.3%) and Job Listings (29.6%).

About a quarter (25.9%) of respondents are currently not employed. The respondents were relatively evenly split between active (44.3%) and passive (55.7%) job seekers, with over half (57.6%) seeking a new position for more than six months.

When asked how they originally found out about the Job Site, no one source predominated. The most commonly indicated items were an IEEE e-mail promotion, selected by a quarter (26.2%) of respondents, followed by the IEEE renewal form (15.0%) and ieee.org (13.5%).

When asked what other online recruitment sites they used, Monster.com was most popular, selected by 58.5%, followed by Careerbuilder.com at 41.5%. When asked about other career information resources, Business Contacts/Networking where most popular (selected by 74.0%), followed by Friends or Family (51.4%) and Recruitment Search Firms (49.4%). Respondents also indicated that Business Contacts/Networking were most likely to lead to being hired for a job (32.6% who used this form indicated that it led to being hired).

 
 

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FAP Medical Diagnosis Survey

Key Findings:
When asked if they would seek a second opinion if diagnosed with a serious medical condition, nearly all (90.5%) agreed or strongly agreed that they would. When a specific product for second opinion services was described, most participants liked it (53.3% liked, 23.1% strongly liked).

However only a small group (4.8%) indicated that they would definitely buy, with another quarter (26.1%) stating that they would probably buy. When presented specific pricing (€130, US$180), the percent who indicated they would definitely buy doubled to 11.4%).

 
 

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FAP Global Mobility Survey

Key Findings:
Slightly under one-fifth (17.4%) of respondents indicated that they are currently working outside of their native country. For these respondents, about two-thirds (69.2%) of their employers were based in the country in which they were working while the remaining one-third (30.8%) were located in another country (either the respondents native country or a third country). More than half of respondents (54.2%) agreed at least somewhat that opportunities are better outside their native country (versus only 25.5% who disagreed). About a third (35.7%) stated that they are likely or very likely to consider employment opportunities outside their native country.

When asked what skills they would need to develop or improve in order to consider career opportunities abroad, language skills were the most frequently cited item, selected by 60.6%, followed by cultural awareness/knowledge, selected by 43.2%. When asked how they would prefer to learn another language, half (49.6%) selected classroom instruction. Both online instruction and CD-ROM tutorials were selected by a little more than a third of respondents (37.1% and 36.4%, respectively). Very few (5.0%) were aware of IEEE’s efforts in technical English instruction, but more than a quarter of respondents (26.7%) indicated an interest in it.

 
 

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ICASSP Conference Evaluation Survey

Key Findings:
Just over two-thirds (69.9%) indicated that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the conference, the more than three-quarters (76.7%) indicating that the content was relevant or very relevant. Nearly all (96.5%) would recommend the conference to colleagues.

Only a small portion of respondents (4.7%) attended the THEMES (Thematic Meetings on Signal Processing), and when asked why, the three most frequently mentioned reasons were unaware of THEMES, lack of interest, and lack of time.

When asked how the heard about ICASSP 2010, about half indicated that it was through word of mouth (49.6%) or the ICASSP website (48.1%). These were also the most common sources of information about the call for papers. Nearly all (97.0%) respondents registered online and most of these (90.0%) were satisfied or very satisfied with the registration process. A similarly high percentage (92.9%) was satisfied with the paper submission process.

When asked if they would find it valuable to be able to present their paper online, authors had slightly positive views, with 42.1% seeing at as valuable, while 30.2% indicated it would not be valuable. When asked about viewing papers online as an attendee, the split was similar (46.4% valuable, 31.6% not valuable).

Similar to the pattern seen in other conference evaluations nearly three-quarters (74.0%) thought that the registration fees were too expensive, but the majority (59.8%) indicated that for what they got out of it, the value of the conference was high or very high.

 
 
 

WIE Magazine Readership Survey

Key Findings:
One third of subscribers (33.7%) indicated that they do not read or look through the magazine. When asked why, the majority (61.9%) of these said that they do not actually receive the magazine, while most of the remaining (34.3%) stated that they have no time to read it.

For those that indicated that they did read the magazine, about two-fifths (37.2%) indicated that they took no further actions based on what they read. More than a third (35.9%) stated that they discussed items with others and more than a quarter (26.6%) stated that they passed along items to others. Just over a third (35.2%) also indicated that they would be willing to pass along “blow out” cards to encourage friends or colleagues to join WIE.


The majority of respondents (58.3%) stated a preference for a print edition, as opposed to an electronic edition. A quarter (24.8%) indicated a willingness pay $10 to receive the print version instead of an electronic version.

 
 

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IEEE Foundation Awareness Survey

Key Findings:
One third of subscribers (33.7%) indicated that they do not read or look through the magazine. When asked why, the majority (61.9%) of these said that they do not actually receive the magazine, while most of the remaining (34.3%) stated that they have no time to read it.

For those that indicated that they did read the magazine, about two-fifths (37.2%) indicated that they took no further actions based on what they read. More than a third (35.9%) stated that they discussed items with others and more than a quarter (26.6%) stated that they passed along items to others. Just over a third (35.2%) also indicated that they would be willing to pass along “blow out” cards to encourage friends or colleagues to join WIE.


The majority of respondents (58.3%) stated a preference for a print edition, as opposed to an electronic edition. A quarter (24.8%) indicated a willingness pay $10 to receive the print version instead of an electronic version.

 
 

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IEEE PES Scholarship Fund Survey

Key Findings:
When asked if it is appropriate for PES to try to raise funds to increase the number of students pursuing power and energy as a profession, over and above the current society income, about half of respondents (48.6%) indicated it was appropriate or very appropriate. A similar percentage (48.9%) indicated that they thought PES was positioned to administer such a program, although a lower percentage (40.9%) indicated that PES was positioned to actually raise the funds.

When asked what kinds of activities would be most effective in attracting students to Power and Energy, respondents indicated that internships would be most effective (84.9% indicating effective or very effective) followed by scholarships (70.5%). Student programming at PES meetings was seen as least effective (21.5%). However, when asked to allocate a hypothetical US$1M, on average respondents gave more money to scholarships than to internships (US$504K for scholarships versus US$441K for internships).

 
 

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IEEE Board of Directors Comparison Study

Key Findings:
As in past years, the Board of Directors are, on average, older. They are significantly more tied into IEEE (more society memberships, greater years of service, "Base" rather than "At Risk" in Member Segmentation) and tend to be in the higher membership Grade levels (Senior/Life Senior or  Fellow/Life Fellow). Board members are also more likely to be in Education-related fields.

However, unlike in past years, the Board relatively closely matches the geographic distribution in Regions 1 to 6 and are not more likely to be retired.

 
 
 

IEEE Director Education Session Survey - February

Key Findings:
In comparison to past Director Education sessions, satisfaction levels were significantly higher, with nearly all respondents (93.3%) indicating that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the event. Similarly, nearly all (86.7%) felt that the amount of information provided and the length of the meeting was just right.

 
 

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IEEE Director Orientation Session Survey

Key Findings:
Approximately two-thirds of respondents (68.4%) indicated that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the event. The most useful sessions were on Fiduciary Responsibilities (90.0% indicated useful or very useful and 2010 Year Plan (85.0%).

When asked what areas they would like further information on, no one area was indicated by more than about one-third of respondents, with the most frequently cited items being the IEEE Strategic Plan (cited by 36.4%) and Resources available to  Directors (31.8%).

 
 

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EMBS Naming Survey

Key Findings:
About two-thirds of the respondents indicated that the current name well or very well represents the technology area in which they work (32.1% well, 33.0% very well).

While a plurality 31.7% indicated that the name should not be changed, 68.3% indicated that the name should be changed to something else. The top two choices were "IEEE Biomedical and Health Engineering Society" and "IEEE Health and Biomedical Engineering Society," which combined for 37.0%. On the "Other" choice, by far the most frequently mentioned name was the "IEEE Biomedical Engineering Society," mentioned by over half of those that selected other.

Those that are more satisfied with their membership, engaged in more ways with EMBS (e.g., author, conference attendee) and those that have been members longer were more likely to say that they do not want the name to be changed.

There are some differences by field of interest, with those in BioNano/BioMEMS technology and Cell and tissue engineering, biomechanics, and biomaterials lelast supportive of changing the name and those in Information technology in biomedicine and healthcare and Clinical engineering most supportive of changing the name.

The two  most frequently indicated employment sections, Academia (selected by 59.9%) and Industry (24.7%) differed little in their preferences for new names. Retired members were least supportive of a name change and students were most supportive.

 
 

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SPS Conference Organizer Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, about three-quarters of respondents indicated that they were satisfied (51.6%) or very satisfied (22.6%) with their experiences as conference organizers.

By far the most frequently selected reasons for volunteering to help organize a conference were to work with colleagues (71.2%) and to support the Society (71.2%). A majority of respondents also selected “To have an impact” (54.5%).

About two-thirds (64.6%) of respondents indicated that they worked with a professional conference organizer on their conference, primarily Conference Management Services. Overall, they were generally satisfied with these services, with just 15% indicating that they were less than satisfied, and nearly all (87.5%) indicated that they would recommend their conference organizer to others (with the remaining 12.5% unsure whether or not they would recommend).

About two-thirds (65.4%) of respondents indicated that they would be interested in new formats for conferences, with virtual conferences (48.5%) and live web casts (45.5%) being the most frequently cited formats.

 
 

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Smart Grid March Meeting Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, while about two-thirds of respondents (64.7%) think that it’s likely or very likely that the Smart Grid initiative will achieve its goals, over one-third (35.3%) think that it’s less than likely for those goals to be achieved. For those that think the goals will be achieved, the primary reasons are because of the dedicated and talented individuals involved and because of the ability of IEEE to develop similar kinds of products and services (e.g., publications, standards, conferences). For those who are less positive, concerns expressed included lack of definition of goals and the difficulty in bringing together the various parts of IEEE.

When asked who are and who should be the target audiences for the Smart Grid Initiative, the greatest number (83%) indicated that Smart Grid Initiative should serve decision makers in industry although less than half (44%) thought that the Initiative was currently serving this audience. Other key target audience identified by more than half of respondents were decision makers in government (74%), the general public (57%), and all technology professionals (52%).

 
 

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ISSC Conference Evaluation Survey

Key Findings:
Overall satisfaction with the conference was high with the vast majority (85.8%) indicating that they were satisfied (73.0%) or extremely satisfied (12.8%).

By far the most frequently selected reason for attending was to learn about latest advances in their specialty (91.6%). A majority of respondents also selected “Learn about related fields” (62.4%) and “Networking” (60.5%).

A plurality of respondents (34.3%) indicated that they preferred the combination of the new “compact” advance program combined with the Web details, while nearly (30.5%) as many indicated that they preferred the old style Advance program.

A majority of respondents (57.2%) indicated that they would prefer both the hard copy and the DVD of the Technical Papers, even with a slightly higher registration cost.

 
 

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Member Development Community Survey

Key Findings:
Just over half of respondents (53.0%) indicated that they were satisfied or extremely satisfied with the resources, support, and information they receive for Membership Development.

In terms of specific tools, they indicated highest levels of satisfaction with the Membership Development "MD Monthly" Report (59.1% satisfied or extremely satisfied) and lowest levels with Membership Development Strategy Templates (27.8%) and Membership Development Virtual Community (25.2%). The tools that had lowest levels of satisfaction also tended to have the lowest levels of awareness.

When asked how well they understood the “First Year Member Experience Initiative” less than a third (30.9%) indicated that they understood it well or very well.

 
 

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New Hampshire Section Survey

Key Findings:
Just over half of respondents (52.8%) were satisfied or very satisfied with their IEEE membership, and only about one-third (29.7%) were satisfied or very satisfied with the New Hampshire section.

Only about one third of respondents (35.2%) had participated in at least one section activity, with attending a section meeting (17.0%) the most frequently cited involvement. When asked about potential participation in future activities, the most popular activity was technical tours, (36.2% likely or very likely to participate) followed by continuing education (32.4%) and technical meetings (32.3%). Least popular were a Section Awards Banquets (9.0%) and Section business meetings (8.8%).

When asked if they would be willing to volunteer to help Section committees or groups one-third (33.2%) said yes and provided their contact information.

 
 

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Strategic Research Annual Report 2012

The IEEE Strategic Research Annual Report 2012 (PDF, 696 KB) summarizes research findings from 60 IEEE Strategic Research and Planning studies completed in 2012.

Please contact Marc Beebe to receive more information on the studies in the report.