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IEEE Potentials is a magazine published by the IEEE with a current circulation of about 45,000 student and recent graduate members. It is dedicated to serving the needs of undergraduate and graduate students as well as entry-level engineers. Subjects are explored through timely manuscripts. We hope to assist our readers on a technical, professional and personal development level.

 

Content

Manuscripts can deal with theory, practical applications or new research. Technical manuscripts (or any other kind) should not "talk down to" nor "be over the heads of" the intended audience. They can be tutorial in nature; however, equations should be kept to a minimum if used at all. The manuscripts in Scientific American are good examples of the right level. Also, please include five to six lines of autobiographical information with your manuscript.

Manuscripts should be stand-alone in nature. Please only list the important references at the end of your manuscript. There should not be any embedded reference numbers. If you need to cite authors for key points or quotes, please state them in the text and give the full reference at the end of the paper.

Submitted manuscripts are reviewed using students, POTENTIALS staff, expert reviewers and others as appropriate. You should also recommend at least two people to review your manuscript.

 
 

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Text Submissions

The first page should have your name, address, e-mail and telephone number. Pages should be numbered consecutively.  

Manuscripts should be single column, double-spaced, and preferably in the Times font and word.doc.

Please also send a PDF of the paper. We use the PDF for the review process and also to verify symbols and such during the editing process. 

 
 

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Preparation - Art

Graphs and diagrams must reproduce well when reduced in size. They should be drawn with just the major coordinate lines. Lettering should be in upper- and lower case.

Line drawings submitted as files should be in JPEG, encapsulated postscript (EPS) or bitmapped (TIFF) format at 300 dpi published size).

Graphics files: Submit each figure as an individual file and name each file as it relates to the manuscript (for example, fig1.eps, fig2.jpg, photo1.tif, etc.). Please avoid using presentation packages (such as Harvard Graphics, Powerpoint) and high-end CAD packages.

Screen-capture images should be submitted in bitmapped format (TIFF or PCX). Before the image is captured, set the screen resolution as high as possible (a minimum of 300 dpi) and make the image as large as possible.

Photographs taken with a digital camera should be submitted in a TIFF or EPS format. Photographs taken with a traditional camera should be submitted as high-quality color prints.

The manuscript's length (number of words) is determined by the number of planned (published) pages and illustrations. You can use the chart below to locate the approximate number of words your manuscript should be. Generally, 4,000 words should be the maximum number.

                                                          NUMBER OF PLANNED ILLUSTRATIONS

 

 

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

SCHEDULED

1

1100

900

X

X

X

X

X

NUMBER OF

2

X

2000

1700

X

X

X

X

PUBLISHED

3

X

3100

2900

2600

2400

X

X

PAGES

4

X

X

4000

3700

3400

3200

3000

 

NOTE: Whenever an "X" appears that number of illustrations is usually not appropriate for that number of pages.  

Submit manuscripts electronically through Manuscript Central

 

An author who would like assistance with English grammar and usage prior to submitting their manuscript to an IEEE publication for review or during the review process can now go directly to get professional editing assistance to submit a manuscript for copy editing. The SPi copy editors will edit for grammar, usage, organization, and clarity, querying potentially substantive revisions as necessary. An author can use the service, at their own expense, as often as desired. Cost estimates are available immediately on line. Edited manuscripts will generally be returned to the author within two weeks of submission.

 
 

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Essays

Got something to say? We are looking for opinion pieces 900 to 1,000 words long on a given topic. Keep in mind, editing will most likely occur. Below are two examples that ran in the August/September 2003 issue. Please include your name, where you go or attended school, and your e-mail address. Please send your commentary mail to Manuscript Central.

 
 

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Conscious Choices

The ethical dilemma is a problem as old as the human conscience. Should one abide by principles, or by company policy? Should there be any attenuating circumstances? Such as potential harm or potential risk. Should we be afraid to be the voice of truth in a sea of deceit? What is to be accomplished? What can be accomplished? Is potential accomplishment even an issue when ethics are involved?

Many believe that ethics is what we do when no one else is looking. But there are many aspects to consider. That is why there will probably never be a single, concise, final answer to ethical dilemmas. We do not have the luxury of living in a world where our ethical choices have no bearing on our financial well-being, or that of our families. And if we decide to voice our concerns, we face possible reprimands, the risk of losing position, employment, prestige and a financial stability that most of us cannot afford to lose.

Ultimately, it all boils down to single defining aspect of the human condition: conscience. What actions, or in actions for that matter, can we live with? Until we achieve a more impartial and enlightened world, this will be the criterion that will dictate our conduct. All codes of ethics, all laws, all rules can be bent, avoided, side-stepped or even blatantly disregarded if one has the means, financial or other, to get away with it. The only thing we cannot escape from is our own conscience. Thus, education should strive to be formative as well as informative. This will most likely not solve all ethical problems, or perhaps not any of them. However, I am unable to see how we can reduce the ethical dilemmas, conflicts of interest and other such situations without a more elevated, more evolved conscience. We also need a greater regard for the consequences of our actions, mainly, who they affect and how. If we start using this big picture perspective, maybe we can make the world a better place, or at least, a less harmful one.

Ricardo Guerra
CITEDI-IPN, Tijuana, Baja CA, Mexico