Skip Navigation
 
Follow:
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube GooglePlus
Share:

Home  >  Publications & Standards  >  Proceedings

 

 

 

closeClose



The Proceedings of the IEEE Editorial Board oversees the mission of the Proceedings.

 

About the EIC

TrussellH. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC, USA

H. Joel Trussell received his B.S. in Math from Georgia Tech (1967), M.S. in Math from Florida State (1968), and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of New Mexico (1976). He worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory from 1969 to 1980 in image and signal processing. During 1978–79, he was a visiting professor at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Scotland, working with both the university and with industry on image processing problems. In 1980, he joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA, where he is now a professor. He was Director of Graduate Programs (2002–2010) for ECE. During 1988–89, he was a visiting scientist at the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY, USA. He was visiting scientist for Color Savvy Systems in 1997–98. He was a visiting fellow commoner at Trinity College, Cambridge University, UK (6 months, 2007), and Visiting Scientist at Hewlett-Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA, USA (6 months, 2008).

 
 
 

Proceedings of the IEEE Editorial Board

Photo of Derek Abbott

Derek Abbott
University of Adelaide
Australia

Derek Abbott obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at Loughborough University of Technology, UK, and completed his Ph.D., with recommendation for distinction, in Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Adelaide, Australia. He worked for nine years at the GEC Hirst Research Centre, London, on infrared and visible image sensors, requiring discipline in VLSI design, optoelectronics, device physics, semiconductor noise, fabrication, and testing. He has worked with both novel and standard technologies including nMOS, CMOS, CCD, SOS, GaAs, and vacuum microelectronics. Since emigrating to Australia, he has worked for Austek Microsystems, Technology Park, SA; has been with the University of Adelaide since 1987; and is a lecturer within the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. He is a founder member and Deputy Director of the Centre for High Performance Integrated Systems and Technologies, Adelaide, instituted in 1987. He has been consultant to various UK and Australian defense and industry organizations. His current research interests are in the areas of VLSI, GaAs, photodetectors, smart sensors, imaging devices, device physics, and noise. His most recent contribution is the discovery of a new photovoltaic self-biasing internal gain effect within planar GaAs MESFETs.

Photo of Tulay Adali

Tulay Adali
University of Maryland
Baltimore, MD, USA

Tulay Adali received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA, in 1992 and joined the faculty at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD, USA, the same year. She is currently a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at UMBC. Her research interests are in the areas of statistical signal processing, machine learning for signal processing, and biomedical data analysis. She has published more than 300 refereed articles, 100 of which are in journals, and a book in these areas. She has been very active in conference and workshop organizations and has served on numerous editorial boards as associate editor and advisory board member. Prof. Adali is a Fellow of  IEEE and the AIMBE, recipient of a 2010 IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award, and an NSF CAREER Award. She is an IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer for 2012 and 2013.

Photo of Silvio E. Barbin

Silvio E. Barbin
University of São Paulo
Sao Paulo, Brazil

Silvio E. Barbin received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Brazil, in 1974 and  M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the same institution. He worked for AEG-Telefunken in Germany and Brazil and served as CTO of Microline RF-Multiplexers and Deputy Director of Center for Information Technology RenatoArcher from the Ministery of Science and Technology in Brazil. He was a research scholar at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, and a research professor at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA. He has published more than 90 papers in conferences and journals. In 1987 he joined the Telecommunications and Control Engineering Department at University of Sao Paulo, where he is a Professor in Electromagnetics and other related subjects. His research interests are in the areas of cognitive radio, reconfigurable and smart antennas, microwave circuits, and electromagnetic modeling. Dr. Barbin is a co-founder of the Brazilian Microwave Society and a member of several other scientific societies. He was honored professor for a number of times at his university. He is a member-at-large of the Products Services Publications Board and an Associated Editor for Antennas Wireless and Propagation Letters.

Photo of Sankar Basu

Sankar Basu
National Science Foundation
Arlington, VA, USA

Sankar Basu is a permanent member of NSF scientific staff and is a program Director. He came to NSF from the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center at the beginning of fiscal year 2003. After receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA, he served on the faculty of Stevens Institute of Technology, where he taught and conducted funded research (Air-Force, NSF), and for a brief period was with the Naval Underwater Systems Center, CT, USA, as a visiting senior scientist. He has visited the Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany, as an Alexander von Humboldt fellow, and the MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (MA, USA) for extended periods. At NSF his primary responsibilities include Design Automation for Micro and Nano-Systems, which includes VLSI CAD, micro-fluidics, mixed signals systems and nano-computing architectures. Dr. Basu's past research interests had been in the analytical aspects circuits, signals, and systems. At IBM, he worked on statistical learning, speech, and multimedia data retrieval, and has extensively published on filter synthesis, image processing, nonlinear modeling techniques.

Benediktsson

Jón Atli Benediktsson
University of Iceland
Reykjavik, Iceland

Jón Atli Benediktsson received the Cand.Sci. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Iceland, Reykjavik, in 1984, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1987 and 1990, respectively. He is currently Pro Rector for Academic Affairs and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Iceland. His research interests are in remote sensing, biomedical analysis of signals, pattern recognition, image processing, and signal processing, and he has published extensively in those fields. Prof. Benediktsson was the 2011‐2012 President of the IEEE Geoscience and and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) and has been on the GRSS AdCom since 2000. He was Editor‐in‐Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (TGRS) from 2003 to 2008 and has served as Associate Editor of TGRS since 1999 and the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters since 2003. He was the Chairman of the IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing (J‐STARS) 2007‐2010. Prof. Benediktsson is a co-founder of the biomedical start up company Oxymap. He received the Stevan J. Kristof Award from Purdue University in 1991 as outstanding graduate student in remote sensing. In 1997, Dr. Benediktsson was the recipient of the Icelandic Research Council's Outstanding Young Researcher Award, in 2000, he was granted the IEEE Third Millennium Medal, in 2004, he was a co‐recipient of the University of Iceland's Technology Innovation Award, in 2006 he received the yearly research award from the Engineering Research Institute of the University of Iceland, and in 2007, he received the Outstanding Service Award from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society. He is co‐recipient of the 2012 IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing Paper Award. He is a Fellow of IEEE and of SPIE, and a member of Societas Scinetiarum Islandica and Tau Beta Pi.

Photo of Dushan Boroyevich

Dushan Boroyevich
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA, USA

Dushan Boroyevich received his Dipl.Ing. degree from the University of Belgrade in 1976 and his M.S. from the University of Novi Sad in 1982, both in Yugoslavia. He received his Ph.D. in 1986 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA, USA. From 1986 to 1990, he was Assistant Professor and Director of the Power and Industrial Electronics Research Program in the Institute for Power and Electronic Engineering at the University of Novi Sad, and later, acting Head of the Institute. He then joined the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech as associate professor. He is now the American Electric Power Professor at the Department and Codirector of the Center for Power Electronics Systems (CPES). Since 1998, Dushan Boroyevich together with Prof. Fred Lee has led the team of over 20 professors and over 200 students in the US National Science Foundation-sponsored Engineering Research Center for Power Electronics Systems (CPES). His research interests include multi-phase power conversion, electronic power distribution systems, power electronics systems modeling and control, and multi-disciplinary design optimization.

Photo of Babu Chalamala

Babu Chalamala
SunEdison, Inc.
St. Peters, MO, USA

Babu Chalamala is an elected Fellow of the Technical Staff at SunEdison, where he leads R&D and product development in grid scale energy storage. Prior to joining MEMC/SunEdison in 2011, for six years he led two startup ventures, first at Indocel Technologies commercializing large format lithium batteries, followed by Stellarray, where he led the development of digital X-ray sources. Earlier, he was a manager and principal staff scientist at Motorola. He started his professional career at the Central Research Laboratories of Texas Instruments. He has been an active volunteer of IEEE and the Materials Research Society for over 20 years. He served as General Chair of the 2006 MRS Fall Meeting, and currently serves on the Technical Program Committee and Awards Subcommittee of the MRS. He was a member of the Technical Council of IEEE Photonics Society and chaired the Technical Committee on Displays for three years. In 2001, he led an IEEE-wide initiative launching the IEEE/OSA Journal of Display Technology and chaired the Steering Committee of the new journal for three years. He received a B.Tech. in Electronics and Communications Engineering from Sri Venkateswara University and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of North Texas.

Chen

Kun-Shan Chen
Chinese Academy of Science
Beijing, China

Kun-Shan Chen received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, in 1990. Since 1992, he has been with the faculty of the Center for Space and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan, where he served as Director from 2001 to 2004 and has held a remote sensing chair professorship since 2008. He has been the Director of the Communication System Research Center at the same university. He is awarded a distinguished visiting chair professorship from the National United University in Taiwan in 2009 for a six‐year term. He has authored and coauthored over 100 refereed journal papers, contributed five book chapters, and is a coauthor (with A. K. Fung) of the book Microwave Scattering and Emission Models for Users (Reading, MA: Artech House, 2010). His research interests include image processing and analysis of remote sensing data, remote sensing for natural hazards and disasters, and microwave scattering and emission theory and modeling from terrain with applications to environmental watch and resource investigation, and wireless communications. Dr. Chen received an outstanding contribution award from the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology in 2009 for his long‐term involvement in cooperative research on rupture deformation and subsidence in Vietnam. He also received the 2012 distinguished award of the National Science Council. He was a guest editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING Special Issue on Remote Sensing for Major Disaster Prevention, Monitoring and Assessment (2007), a founding chair of the GRSS Taipei Chapter, an associate editor of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING (2000Y2011), the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING (2008-2010), of which he is now an Associate Editor. He has been actively involved in establishing a GRSS link to Asia and Southeast Asia, in lines of natural disaster monitoring by remote sensing.

Photo of Steinar Dale

Steinar Dale
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL, USA

Steinar Dale is Director - Center for Advanced Power Systems at Florida State University in Tallahassee, FL, USA, since 2003. He is the Principal Investigator (PI) the Office of Naval Research on electric ship power systems, including the ONR Electric Ship Research and Development Consortium of eight universities. From 1992 to 2003 he held management positions with ABB in Raleigh, NC, USA. From 1984 to 1992 he was with the ORNL in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. From 1976 to 1984, he worked for the Westinghouse R&D Center in Pittsburgh, PA, USA. In 1986-87, he served as a Congressional Science Fellow (IEEE) in the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington, DC, USA. Dale was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 1990. He is past Chairman of the Coalition for the Commercial Applications of Superconductors. Dale earned a Ph.D. from the University of Strathclyde, in Glasgow, Scotland, in Electrical Engineering in 1976.

Photo of Yogesh B. Gianchandani

Yogesh B. Gianchandani
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Yogesh B. Gianchandani received a B.S., M.S, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, with a focus on microelectronics and MEMS. He is presently a Professor at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, with a primary appointment in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department and a courtesy appointment in the Mechanical Engineering Department. He also serves as the Director for the Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS). Dr. Gianchandani’s research interests include all aspects of design, fabrication, and packaging of micromachined sensors and actuators. He has published about 250 papers in journals and conferences and has about 30 US patents issued or pending. He was a Chief Co-Editor of Comprehensive Microsystems: Fundamentals, Technology, and Applications, published in 2008. He serves several journals as an editor or a member of the editorial board, and served as a General Co-Chair for the IEEE/ASME International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in 2002. From 2007 to 2009 he also served at the National Science Foundation as the program director for Micro and Nano Systems within the Electrical, Communication, and Cyber Systems Division (ECCS). Dr. Gianchandani is a Fellow of IEEE.

Photo of J. Michael Golio

J. Michael Golio
Golio Endeavors
Mesa, AZ, USA

J. Michael Golio has served in a variety of volunteer roles for the IEEE MTT-Society and ED-Society. He is the author of hundreds of technical papers, book chapters, and presentations, and the editor of eight engineering handbooks. He also authored Engineering Your Retirement, an IEEE/Wiley book that helps to prepare engineers for a successful and satisfying retirement. In 2002 he was given the IEEE MTT-Society’s N. Walter Cox Award for exemplary service in a spirit of selfless dedication and cooperation. Dr. Golio has held a variety of positions in both the microwave and semiconductor industries, and within academia. As Director of Engineering at two Fortune 500 companies, he directed large R&D organizations. Prior to this, Mike conducted pioneering work on large signal microwave device modeling. He served as an Assistant Professor at Arizona State University where he conducted research in nonlinear modeling. IEEE recognized this work by making Dr. Golio a Fellow of the Institute in 1996.

Photo of Simon Haykin

Simon Haykin
McMaster University
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Simon Haykin received his B.Sc. (first-class honors), Ph.D., and D.Sc., all in Electrical Engineering from the University of Birmingham, England. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is the recipient of the Henry Booker Gold Medal from URSI, 2002, the honorary degree of Doctor of Technical Sciences from ETH Zentrum, Zurich, Switzerland, 1999, and many other medals and prizes. He is a pioneer in adaptive signal-processing with emphasis on applications in radar and communications, an area of research, which has occupied much of his professional life. In the mid-1980s, he shifted the thrust of his research effort in the direction of Neural Computation, which was re-emerging at that time. All along, he had the vision of revisiting the fields of radar and communications from a brand new perspective. Cognitive radio and cognitive radar are two important parts of a much wider and integrative field: cognitive dynamic systems, research into which has become his passion. His new book entitled Cognitive Dynamic Systems: Perception-action cycle, radar and radio, to be published by Cambridge University Press in October 2011, will be the first book written on this subject.

Photo of Bahram Javidi

Bahram Javidi
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT, USA

Bahram Javidi is Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at University of Connecticut, CT, USA. He has been recognized by nine best-paper awards and named Fellow of eight societies, including IEEE, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, Optical Society of America, European Optical Society, International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), and Guggenheim Foundation. He received the 2008 Donald G. Fink Prize chosen among all IEEE Transactions and Journals. He was the recipient of 2010 George Washington University's Distinguished Alumni Scholar Award. In 2007, The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation awarded him the Humboldt Prize for outstanding scientist. He received the Dennis Gabor Award and Technology Achievement Award from SPIE in 2005 and 2008, respectively. He received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from George Washington University in Washington, DC, USA, in 1980 and an M.S. in 1982. He also received a Ph.D. in 1986 in Electrical Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA. He has held visiting positions at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, USA, United States Air Force Rome Lab at Hanscom Air Force Base, University of Stuttgart, and Thomson-CSF Research Labs in Orsay, France. He has been a consultant to government and industry in the areas of optical systems, imaging, and 3D visualization and displays.

Photo of Nan Marie Jokerst

Nan Marie Jokerst
Duke University
Durham, NC, USA

Nan Marie Jokerst is the J.A. Jones Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University, and the Executive Director of the Duke Shared Material Instrumentation Facility (Cleanroom and Characterization Labs). Her Ph.D. and M.S. are in Electrical Engineering (University of Southern California, CA, USA), and her B.S. is in Physics (Creighton University, Omaha, NE, USA). She served on the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology for 14 years, and on the Duke University faculty for nine years. She is an IEEE Fellow and an OSA Fellow, and her awards include a NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, Newport Research Award, IEEE Third Millenium Medal, and IEEE Rigas Medal. She is a member of the National Academies Board on Global Science and Technology. Dr. Jokerst has published over 300 journal and conference papers and eight patents. Her research includes integrated optoelectronics, biomedical photonic imaging, biochemical sensing, lasers integrated onto Si, plasmonics, and metamaterials.

Kanade

Takeo Kanade
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Takeo Kanade is the U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor of Computer Science and Robotics and the director of Quality of Life Technology Engineering Research Center at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his doctorate in Electrical Engineering from Kyoto University, Japan, in 1974. After holding a faculty position in the Department of Information Science, Kyoto University, he joined Carnegie Mellon University in 1980. He was the Director of the Robotics Institute from 1992 to 2001. He also founded the Digital Human Research Center in Tokyo and served as the founding director from 2001 to 2010. Dr. Kanade works in multiple areas of robotics: computer vision, multi‐media, manipulators, autonomous mobile robots, medical robotics and sensors. He has written more than 400 technical papers and reports in these areas and holds more than 20 patents. He has been the principal investigator of more than a dozen major vision and robotics projects at Carnegie Mellon. Dr. Kanade has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a Fellow of  IEEE, a Fellow of the ACM, a Founding Fellow of American Association of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), and the former and founding editor of International Journal of Computer Vision. Awards he received include the Franklin Institute Bower Prize, ACM/AAAI Newell Award, Okawa Award, C&C Award, Tateishi Grand Prize, Joseph Engelberger Award, IEEE Robotics and Automation Society Pioneer Award, FIT Accomplishment Award, and IEEE PAMI‐TC Azriel Rosenfeld Lifetime Accomplishment Award.

Photo of Joy Laskar

Joy Laskar
VP Advanced Technologies
Cupertino, CA, USA

Joy Laskar is currently a Partner at Anayas360, an investment and advisory group in Silicon Valley, which he co-founded after serving two years at InSite Partners. From 1992 to 2011, Dr. Laskar held faculty positions at the University of Hawaii, HI, USA, and at Georgia Tech (GT), GA, USA. At GT, he was the Schlumberger Chair in Microelectronics and founded the Georgia Electronic Design Center. Dr. Laskar’s technical expertise and research contributions are at the intersection of Radio Frequency Electronics, Analog Electronics and Electromagnetics. He has co-authored five textbooks and has published more than 600 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers, 60 patents (issued or pending), and graduated 41 Ph.D. students. He has presented more than 50 invited or plenary talks and received nine best-paper awards. Dr. Laskar’s research has developed four product/technology segments: GaAs high performance EVM power amplifiers (designed in on the Intel Centrino Platform), CMOS Equalizer/Retimer Solution (designed in on the Apple Thunderbolt), CMOS RF Amplifier, Antenna Impedance Tuner for LTE (Qualcomm RF360), and Low-Power mmW Gigabit Wireless (for backhaul and wireless docking). The economic impact of these developments is more than $1 billion.

Photo of Gianluca Lazzi

Gianluca Lazzi
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, UT, USA

Gianluca Lazzi is a USTAR Professor and Department Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. Prior to his appointment at the University of Utah, he was a professor (2006 to present), an associate professor (2003 to 2006), and an assistant professor (1999 to 2003) with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University (NCSU), Raleigh, NC, USA. He has been a visiting researcher with the Italian National Board for New Technologies, Energy, and Environment (ENEA) (1994), a visiting researcher with the University of Rome “La Sapienza” (1994–1995), and a research associate (1995–1998) and research assistant professor (1998–1999) with the University of Utah, UT, USA. He has authored or coauthored over 100 international journal papers or conference presentations on implantable devices, medical applications of electromagnetic fields, antenna design, FDTD modeling, dosimetry, and bioelectromagnetics. Dr. Lazzi was the Chair of Commission K (Electromagnetics in Biology and Medicine) of the U.S. National Committee of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) (2006–2008).

Lee

Insup Lee
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA, USA

Insup Lee is the Cecilia Fitler Moore Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science and Director of PRECISE Center at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has been since 1983. He was CSE Undergraduate Curriculum Chair from September 1994 to August 1997. His research interests include cyber physical systems (CPS), real‐time systems, embedded systems, formal methods and tools, medical device systems, and software engineering. The theme of his research activities has been to assure and improve the correctness, safety, and timeliness of life‐critical embedded systems. In collaboration with his colleagues and students, he has been working on: Temporal Scope and Timed Atomic Commitment for real‐time systems; specification, analysis, and testing techniques based on real‐time process algebra (ACSR); a hierarchical specification language for hybrid systems (CHARON); the first runtime verification (RV) system called (MaC) that that can be used to assure the correctness of a running system through monitoring and checking of safety and QoS properties; compositional analysis techniques for hierachical real‐time systems (CARTS); high‐confidence medical device software and systems (HCMDSS); and quantitative trust management (QTM) that combines policy‐based trust management with reputation‐based trust management. Since the inception of CPS, he has been working in the area of medical cyber physical systems. He has also served on various steering and advisory committees of technical societies, including CPSWeek, ESWeek, ACM SIGBED, IEEE TC‐RTS, RV, ATVA. He has served on the editorial boards on the several scientific journals, including IEEE Transactions on Computers, Formal Methods in System Design, and Real‐Time Systems Journal. He is a founding co‐Editor‐in‐Chief of KIISE Journal of Computing Science and Engineering (JCSE) since Sept 2007. He was a member of Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) Networking and Information Technology (NIT). He is IEEE fellow and received IEEE TC‐RTS Outstanding Technical Achievement and Leadership Award in 2008.

Photo of Yilu Liu

Yilu Liu
University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN, USA

Yilu Liu, a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, VA, USA, has been elected a Fellow of IEEE for her contributions to modeling and diagnostic techniques for power systems. Since joining the Virginia Tech faculty in 1990, Liu has received a number of honors and grants, including the National Science Foundation's Young Investigator Award and the Presidential Faculty Fellow Award. Liu's research has led to Virginia Tech's position as a world leader in power transformer diagnosis. Liu is the Director of the Virginia Tech Power Information Technology Laboratory. Among her research group's initiatives are the Global Positioning System/Internet-based national power system frequency monitoring network and the Virtual Hospital for Power Equipment, a Web site that offers free diagnostic services for the power industry. Liu received an undergraduate degree in her native China and her M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Ohio State University, OH, USA.

Photo of Jianguo Ma

Jianguo Ma
Tianjin University
Tianjin, China

Jianguo Ma received a B.Sc. from Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China, in 1982, and a doctoral degree in engineering from Duisburg University, Duisburg, Germany. He was with Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, from October 1997 to November 2005 as a faculty member, where he was also the founding director of the Center for Integrated Circuits and Systems. From December 2005 to October 2009, he was with University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, China. Since October 2009 he has served as the Dean for the School of Electronic Information Engineering in Tianjin University. He has served as the founding director of the Center for IC & Computing Systems of Tianjin since May 2010. His research interests are: RFICs and RF integrated systems for wireless, RF device characterization modeling, MMIC, RF/Microwave Circuits & Systems, EMI in wireless, RFID & wireless sensing network. He has published about 269 technical papers, six US patents granted and 15 filed/granted China patents, and two books. Dr. Ma served as the Associate Editor of IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters from January 2004 to December 2005. He founded the IEEE EDS Chengdu Chapter.

Photo of H. Troy Nagle

H. Troy Nagle
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC, USA

H. Troy Nagle earned his B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Alabama, AL, USA, in 1964 and 1966, respectively. His education continued with a Ph.D from Auburn University, AL, USA, in 1968 and a M.D. from University of Miami, FL, USA, in 1981. Nagle is a professor at North Carolina State University, NC, USA. He served as Founding Chair of the Biomedical Engineering Department from 2003 to 2009. Professor Nagle focuses his teaching and research on biomedical sensors and medical devices and in recent years has been active in research projects in electronic olfaction. Nagle was made a Fellow of IEEE in 1983. He was IEEE President in 1994.

Photo of Khalil Najafi

Khalil Najafi
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Khalil Najafi is the Schlumberger Professor of Engineering, and Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan since September 2008. He served as the Director of the Solid-State Electronics Laboratory from 1998-2005, has been the director of NSF's National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) since 2004, and the deputy director of the NSF ERC on Wireless Integrated Microsystems (WIMS) at the University of Michigan. He received the B.S., M.S., and the Ph.D. degrees in 1980, 1981, and 1986, respectively, all in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, uSA. His research interests include: micromachining technologies, micromachined sensors, actuators, and MEMS; analog integrated circuits; implantable biomedical microsystems; micropackaging; and low-power wireless sensing/actuating systems. Dr. Najafi has been active in the field of solid-state sensors and actuators for more than 25 years.

Nathan

Arokia Nathan
Cambridge University
Cambridge, United Kingdom

Arokia Nathan holds the Chair of Photonic Systems and Displays in the Department of Engineering, Cambridge University. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Alberta. Following post‐doctoral years at LSI Logic Corp., USA and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, he joined the University of Waterloo where he held the DALSA/NSERC Industrial Research Chair in sensor technology and subsequently the Canada Research Chair in nano‐scale flexible circuits. He was a recipient of the 2001 NSERC E.W.R. Steacie Fellowship. In 2006, he moved to the UK to take up the Sumitomo Chair of Nanotechnology at the London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, where he received the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award. He has held Visiting Professor appointments at the Physical Electronics Laboratory, ETH Zürich and the Engineering Department, Cambridge University, UK. He has published over 400 papers in the field of sensor technology and CAD, and thin film transistor electronics, and is a co‐author of four books. He has over 50 patents filed/awarded and has founded/co‐founded four spin‐off companies. He serves on technical committees and editorial boards in various capacities. He is a Chartered Engineer (UK), Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (UK), Fellow of IEEE (USA), and an IEEE/EDS Distinguished Lecturer.

Photo of Marian W. Pospieszalski

Marian W. Pospieszalski
National Radio Astronomy Observatory
Charlottesville, VA, USA

Marian W. Pospieszalski was awarded an M.Sc. and a D.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the Warsaw University of Technology (WUT), Warsaw, Poland, in 1967 and 1976, respectively. From 1967 to 1984, Dr. Pospieszalski was with Warsaw University of Technology, during which time he held visiting positions with the Electronics Research Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, CA, USA (1977-1978), the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA, USA (1978-1979), and the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA (1982-1984). Since 1984, Dr. Pospieszalski has been with the NRAO, presently as a tenured scientist and senior research engineer. His research interests are in the fields of microwave, millimeter-wave, and high–speed circuits and systems. He has authored or co-authored about 100 journal and conference papers. In 1992, Dr. Pospieszalski was elected Fellow of IEEE. In 2002, Dr. Pospieszalski received the NRAO Distinguished Performance Award and in 2006 the Microwave Application Award from MTT Society.

Photo of Gabriel Rebeiz

Gabriel Rebeiz
University of California, San Diego
La Jolla, CA, USA

Gabriel Rebeiz is Distinguished Professor and the Wireless Communications Industry Endowed Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. He received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering with distinction from the American University in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1982, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology, CA, USA, in 1983 and 1988, respectively. He is an IEEE Fellow, an NSF Presidential Young Investigator, an URSI Koga Gold Medal Recipient, IEEE MTT 2003 Distinguished Young Engineer, and the recipient of the IEEE MTT 2000 Microwave Prize, the IEEE MTT 2010 Distinguished Educator Award, and the IEEE Antennas and Propagation 2011 John D. Kraus Antenna Award. He is also the recipient of the 1998 Amoco Teaching Award given to the best undergraduate teacher at the University of Michigan, and the 2008 Jacobs ECE Teacher of the Year Award at UCSD. He is considered one of the fathers of RF MEMS and tunable networks, silicon RFIC phased arrays, and mm-wave/THz antennas. His book, RF MEMS: Theory, Design, and Technology, John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2003, is the reference in the field. He is the Director of the UCSD/DARPA Center on RF MEMS Reliability and Design Fundamentals.

Photo of Jeffrey H. Reed

Jeffrey H. Reed
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA, USA

Jeffrey H. Reed is the Willis G. Worcester Professor in the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He currently serves as Director of Wireless @ Virginia Tech, VA, USA, one of the largest and most comprehensive university wireless research groups in the US. He is the Founding Faculty Member of the Ted and Karyn Hume Center for National Security and Technology. Since joining Virginia Tech in 1992, Dr. Reed has been PI or co-PI of approximately 100 projects covering areas such as software radio, cognitive radio, ultra wideband, and channel modeling. Dr. Reed is a Fellow of IEEE for contributions to software radio, communications signal processing, and for leadership in engineering education. He is a past recipient of the College of Engineering Award for Excellence in Research. Dr. Reed received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Davis, CA, USA.

Photo of Mark A. Reed

Mark A. Reed
Yale University
New Haven, CT, USA

Mark A. Reed received his Ph.D. in Physics from Syracuse University in 1983, after which he joined Texas Instruments. In 1990 Mark joined Yale University, where he holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science. Mark’s research activities have included the investigation of electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, molecular scale electronic transport, plasmonic transport in nanostructures, and chem/bio nanosensors. Mark is the author of more than 180 professional publications and six books, has given over 25 plenary and over 360 invited talks, and holds 25 US and foreign patents on quantum effect, heterojunction, and molecular devices. He is the Editor in Chief of the journal Nanotechnology. His awards include Fellow of the American Physical Society (2003), the IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology (2007), and Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (2009).

Photo of Roberto Sorrentino

Roberto Sorrentino
University of Perugia
Perugia, Italy

Roberto Sorrentino is Professor at the University of Perugia, Italy. His research activities have been concerned with numerical methods and CAD techniques for passive microwave structures and with the analysis and design of microwave and millimeter-wave circuits and antennas. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 technical papers in international journals and 200 refereed conference papers and four books (J. Wiley, 2000, McGrawHill, 2006, 2007, J. Wiley 2010). Roberto Sorrentino is an IEEE Fellow (1990). He received the MTT-S Meritorious Service Award (1993), the IEEE Third Millennium Medal (2000), and the Distinguished Educator Award from IEEE MTT-S (2004). He served the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) as Vice Chair (1993-1996) then Chair (1996-1999) of the Commission D (Electronics and Photonics). Since 2007 he has been the President of the Italian Commission of URSI. In 1998 he was among the founders of the European Microwave Association and its first President from 1998 to 2009. In 2010 he received the EuMA Distinguished Service Award.

Tekalp

A. Murat Tekalp
KOÇ University
Istanbul, Turkey

A. Murat Tekalp received double major B.S. degrees in electrical engineering and mathematics from Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 1980 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical, computer and systems engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, in 1982 and 1984, respectively. After working briefly at Eastman Kodak Research, he joined the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, as an Assistant Professor in 1987, where he was promoted to Distinguished University Professor. He joined Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 2001, where he is currently the Dean of Engineering. He authored the book Digital Video Processing (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice‐Hall, 1995). He holds eight US patents. Prof. Tekalp is a member of Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA), and a member of Academia Europaea. He has been elected a Distinguished Lecturer by IEEE Signal Processing Society in 1998 and received the TUBITAK Science Award in 2004. He has been a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society Technical Committee on Image and Multidimensional Signal Processing from 1990 to 1999, and chaired it during January 1996 December 1997. He has been the Editor‐in‐Chief of the EURASIP Journal Signal Processing: Image Communication published by Elsevier (1999-2010). Formerly, he has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING (1990-1992) and the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING (1994-1996). He was also on the Editorial Board of the IEEE Signal Processing Magazine (2006-2009) and Academic Press Journal Visual Communication and Image Representation (1995-2002). He was appointed as the Special Sessions Chair for the 1995 IEEE International Conference on Image Processing, the Technical Program Co‐Chair for the 2000 IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Istanbul, Turkey, the General Chair of the IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), Rochester, NY, in 2002, and Technical Program Co‐Chair of the 2005 European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), Antalya, Turkey. He is the founder and first Chairman of the Rochester Chapter of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. He was elected as the Chair of the Rochester Section of IEEE in 1994-1995. He is a member of the Advanced Grant panel for the European Research Council, and a project evaluator and referee for the European Commission. He is also appointed as a National Expert for the European Commission.

Photo of Ching-Kuang Clive Tzuang

Ching-Kuang Clive Tzuang
Tianjin University
Tianjin, China

Ching-Kuang Clive Tzuang, born on May 10, 1955, received a B.S. in Electronic Engineering from National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, in 1977; an M.S. from the University of California at Los Angeles, CA, USA, in 1980; and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA, in 1986. From 1981 to 1984, he was with TRW, Redondo Beach, CA, USA. He became an associate professor at Institute of Communication Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan, in 1986, and a full professor in 1991, and Acer-Endowed Chair 1999-2001. He joined the Graduate Institute of Communication Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, in February 2004, and became Professor Emeritus in January 2012. Since February 2012, he was invited to Tianjin University, China, as a distinguished professor.

Unser

Michael Unser
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)
Switzerland

Michael Unser is Professor and Director of EPFL's Biomedical Imaging Group (Lausanne, Switzerland). His main research area is biomedical image processing. He has a strong interest in sampling theories, multiresolution algorithms, wavelets, the use of splines for image processing, and, more recently, sparsity and stochastic processes. He is the author of over 200 published journal papers in these areas, with a substantial scientific impact (Google scholar h‐index >70). He was born in Zug, Switzerland, on 9 April 1958. He received the M.S. (summa cum laude) and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1981 and 1984, respectively, from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. From 1985 to 1997, he was with the Biomedical Engineering and Instrumentation Program, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda USA, conducting research on bioimaging and heading the Image Processing Group. Michael Unser received the Dommer prize for excellence in 1981 (1st rank among all EPFL graduates) and the research prize of the Brown-Boveri Corporation (Switzerland) for his Ph.D. thesis in 1984. He is recipient of the IEEE Signal Processing Society's 1995 Best Paper Award (with A. Aldroubi and M. Eden), the IEEE Signal Processing Society's 2000 Magazine Award, and the IEEE Signal Processing Society's 2003 Best Paper Award (with T. Blu). He has held the position of associate Editor‐in‐Chief (2003‐2005) for the IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging. He is (or was) a member of the editorial boards of Foundations and Trends in Signal Processing, the SIAM Journal of Imaging Sciences, the Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision,
Sampling Theory in Signal and Image Processing, Signal Processing (1997-2000), Pattern Recognition (2000‐2006), the Journal of Visual Communication and Image Representation (1997‐2006), and the IEEE Signal Processing Magazine (2003‐2006). He also served as Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging (1999‐2002; 2006‐present) including Guest Editor for its special issue on Wavelets in Medical Imaging, the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing (1992‐1995), and the IEEE Signal Processing Letters (1994‐1998). He is currently member of the editorial boards of IEEE J. Selected Topics in Signal Processing, Foundations and Trends in Signal Processing, and SIAM J. Imaging Sciences. Dr. Unser co‐organized the 1994 IEEE‐EMBS Workshop on Wavelets in Medicine and Biology, and served as regular chair for SPIE's annual conference on Wavelets from 1993 to 2003. He was general co‐chair (with Z.P. Liang) for the first IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI'2002), which was held in Washington, DC, 7-10 July 2002. He was chairman of the IEEE-SPS technical committee on Bio Imaging and Signal Processing (BISP) (2004-2006), as well as the ISBI steering committee (2006-2008). Prof. Unser is a Fellow of the IEEE (1999) and the recipient of two IEEE Technical Achievement Awards (2008 SPS and 2010 EMBS). He is an EURASIP Fellow and a member of the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences. He is frequently invited as plenary or tutorial speaker at international conferences including flagship IEEE meetings such as ICIP, ICASSP and ISBI.

Photo of Usha Varshney

Usha Varshney
National Science Foundation
Arlington, VA, USA

Usha Varshney is a Program Director for Electronics, Photonics, and Magnetic Devices (EPMD) in the Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS) at the National Science Foundation, managing the interdisciplinary science and engineering research thrust areas for spin electronics, micro and nanomagnetic devices and circuits, memories, bioelectronics, molecular electronics, and sensors technologies. She joined the National Science Foundation in December 1997, as Program Director of Physical Foundations of Enabling Technologies, and Integrative Systems programs, in ECS. From October 2003 to June 2004, Dr. Varshney was a Legislative Fellow in the U.S. 108th Congress, and a ComSci Fellow in the Science and Technology Fellowship Program of the U.S. Department of Commerce, during which time she worked on Capitol Hill in processing and management of Senate legislative actions relating to Science, Nanotechnology and Space in the Office of Virginia Senator George Allen. She had a leadership role in the passage of Senate Bill S.189 on Nanotechnology signed into law (PL 108-153) by President Bush on 3 December 2003, and in the organization of the bipartisan and bicameral "Congressional Nanotechnology Caucus" established by Senator Allen on 1 April 2004. From July 2004 to August 2008, she was the Division Director for ECCS.

Photo of Robert Weigel

Robert Weigel
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Erlangen, Germany

Robert Weigel has been Head of the Institute for Electronics Engineering at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg since 2002. He received the Dr.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing.habil. degrees, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, from the Munich University of Technology in Germany. From 1982 to 1996, he was Research Engineer, Sr. Research Engineer, and finally a Professor for RF Circuits and Systems at the Munich University of Technology. In winter 1994/95 he was a Guest Professor for SAW Technology at Vienna University of Technology in Austria. From 1996 to 2002, he was Director of the Institute for Communications and Information Engineering at the University of Linz, Austria. In August 1999, he co-founded DICE - Danube Integrated Circuit Engineering, Linz, one part of which is an Infineon Technologies Design Center and the other part an Intel Mobile Communications Design Center, respectively. In 2009 he co-founded eesy-id, Erlangen and eesy-ic, Nuremberg, Germany. Currently, he is the Speaker of the Electrical Engineering Division of the German Research Foundation, and 2013 IEEE MTT-S President Elect. He has been engaged in research and development on microwave theory and techniques, integrated circuits, SAW technology, digital and microwave communication systems, and automotive EMC.

Photo of Andreas Weisshaar

Andreas Weisshaar
Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR, USA

Andreas Weisshaar received the Diplom-Ingenieur (Dipl.-Ing.) degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, in 1987, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA, in 1986 and 1991, respectively. In 1991, he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (now School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science) at Oregon State University, where he is a Full Professor. From April 2008 to August 2011 he served as Program Director for Communications, Circuits, and Sensing-Systems at the U.S. National Science Foundation. Prof. Weisshaar’s current research interests include integrated passive RF/microwave circuits and components, electronic packaging, and wireless communications. He has authored/co-authored numerous papers in these areas, and co-authored Transmission Lines and Wave Propagation, 4th Edition (Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2001). Prof. Weisshaar is a Fellow of IEEE.

Wood

Sally Wood
Santa Clara University
Santa Clara, CA, USA

Coming soon.

Photo of Ke Wu

Ke Wu
École Polytechnique de Montréal
Montréal, Québec, Canada

Ke Wu is Tier-I Canada Research Chair Professor in RF and millimeter-wave engineering at the Ecole Polytechnique (University of Montreal). He has been the Director of the Poly-Grames Research Center and the founding Director of the Center for Radiofrequency Electronics Research of Quebec. He has authored or co-authored over 900 referred papers and a number of books/book chapters and filed more than 30 patents. His current research interests involve substrate integrated circuits (SICs), antenna arrays, advanced CAD and modeling techniques, wireless power transmission and harvesting, and development of low-cost RF and millimeter-wave transceivers and sensors. He is also interested in the modeling and design of microwave photonic circuits and systems. Dr. Wu has held key positions in and has served on various panels, editorial boards, and international committees. He is an elected IEEE MTT-S AdCom member. He was the recipient of many awards and prizes including the inaugural IEEE MTT-S Outstanding Young Engineer Award, the 2004 Fessenden Medal and the 2009 Thomas W. Eadie Medal, and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. He is a Fellow of IEEE, the Canadian Academy of Engineering, and the Royal Society of Canada. He was an IEEE MTT-S Distinguished Microwave Lecturer.

Zhang

Lixia Zhang
University of California, Los Angelos
Los Angeles, CA, USA

Lixia Zhang received her PhD degree in computer science from MIT in 1989 and joined Xerox Palo Alto Research Center as a member of research staff. Her work at Xerox PARC included analysis of TCP traffic dynamics, reliable multicast protocols, and designs of Internet integrated services support; the RSVP protocol was conceived and developed during that time. She joined the faculty of UCLA Computer Science Department in 1995. Since then her research focus has been on the global Internet infrastructure including the global Internet routing system and Domain Name Systems. Since 2010 Zhang has been leading a multiple‐campus research project on the development of a new Internet architecture called Named Data Networking (NDN). Over the years Zhang has served as the vice chair of ACM SIGCOMM, member of the editorial board for the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, member of the Internet Architecture Board, and co‐chair of the Routing Research Group under IRTF. She is a fellow of ACM and a fellow of IEEE, and the recipient of 2009 IEEE Internet Award. She holds UCLA Jon Postel Chair in computer science.