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Projects completed by IEEE Strategic Research in 2009 are listed below.  If you would like additional information, on any of these research projects, please contact Marc Beebe at marc.beebe@ieee.org.

 

What's New Newsletter Survey

Key Findings:
Of the respondents who currently subscribe to the What’s New newsletter, about half (50.5%) indicated that they were satisfied or very satisfied.

When asked what content they wanted in newsletter for Xplore, the most highly rated items were IEEE Xplore Content Highlights (for example, description of journal issues, conference proceedings, courses), indicated as important or very important by 58.1% and Xplore user tips (48.9%).

The majority (65.1%) indicated that their preferred format was an e-mail with Headlines and descriptions with links to Web pages for full story, while only 25.5% preferred the entire newsletter in the e-mail.

 
 

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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Member Survey

Key Findings:
Approximately two-thirds of respondents are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with their membership in EMBS, while fewer than 5% are Dissatisfied or Very Dissatisfied. 

Similar to many other surveys with IEEE members and members of other Societies, EMBS respondents indicated that helping them stay current on technical developments is the most important aspect of their membership, followed by access to practical content, and providing opportunities to publish and/or present research.  Least important to members are providing opportunities to volunteer and discounts on professional and personal services. 

There are some significant differences between those in academia and those in industry within EMBS.  Those in academia are much more likely to say that providing opportunities to publish and/or present research is important to them, and academics are more satisfied than non-academics with the job that EMBS is doing in that area.  Conversely, respondents in industry are less satisfied with the job that EMBS is doing in giving them access to content that is related to their work.

 
 

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IEEE/IET Electronic Library Penetration Study

Key Findings:

Just under half (46%) of participants have electronic access to some IEEE content beyond IEEE Spectrum, and fewer than half of these (22% of total respondents) have IEEE/IET Electronic Library access (defined as the ability to access all seven types of documents available). 

Note:  The more complex interview methodology was used in this study because of a  lack of confidence in the standard web survey method of asking general questions regarding access.  However, comparison of the current telephone survey results with recent web survey results demonstrates that the web survey only slightly overstates the percentage of members with some electronic access to IEEE publications.

 
 

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Eye on Washington Newsletter Survey

Key Findings:
Just over three-quarters of respondents are IEEE members, just under half work in private industry, and retirees constitute slightly more than one-tenth. 

Two-thirds of respondents rated the Eye on Washington newsletter’s overall quality as Good or Excellent.  Slightly fewer (61%) are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with their subscriptions to the newsletter.  The majority (61%) of respondents also prefers the current balance of size and frequency for the newsletter to other options. 

Only approximately one-half of respondents read more than the e-mail summary of the Eye on Washington newsletter, and the majority (66%) prefers the current version of the summary, with links to web pages, to an attached full PDF (22%) as well as to the full newsletter in an HTML e-mail (11%).

 
 

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Membership Messaging Analysis

Key Findings:
Several factors bind members to IEEE, and the bond is even stronger at the Society level where members’ specialty interests are more directly addressed:

• Most members recognize IEEE as the world’s premiere engineering association and take pride in their connection to the organization.  Members who value the prestige of IEEE membership think membership costs are reasonable for a world-class organization.  Even dissatisfied members want their issues resolved so that they can enjoy membership rather than abandon IEEE.

• Most members want IEEE to meet its responsibility to the profession through superior member services.  Membership benefits named most useful are high-quality publications, a worldwide community of engineers, access to the latest technological developments in the field, and professional guidance and career development services.  These benefits are even more prized at the Society level.

• Many members value the international aspect of IEEE and the exposure they have to members and ideas worldwide.  In fact, some feel that IEEE is too focused on the United States and does not sufficiently cover the rest of the world in terms of both content and benefits.

IEEE members place a premium on speed and ease of accessibility for all aspects of membership due to hectic schedules.  Any way that IEEE can facilitate members’ professional duties, such as by offering electronic information or reducing electronic malfunctions, enhances membership value and may even mitigate cost issues.

A frequent complaint is that IEEE publications are written more for academics and researchers than for the average working engineer, referring in part to “non-work-applicable” article topics but also to article language, which nonacademics find difficult to “translate.”

 
 

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Member Messaging Bulletin Board Focus Groups

Key Findings:
For IEEE members, the two most relevant membership messages concern advancing their careers and building their professional networks.  For Higher Grade members, advancing their careers is the most relevant;  while for Student members, networking is ranked highest, perhaps because many of the students had not yet fully launched into their careers.

Overall, the most effective message has the following qualities:

• Believable—It does not overstate IEEE’s role or make claims that cannot be backed up with facts;

• Inspiring—It appeals to the ambition and ideals of the target audience;

• Inclusive—It speaks to all of IEEE’s constituencies, not just engineers or computing professionals;

• Advantageous—It suggests the benefits to the individual by answering the question, “What’s in it for me?”

• Unique—It sets IEEE apart from other organizations serving the same stakeholders;

• Original—It does not sound like a generic advertisement;  and perhaps,

• Targeted—It speaks to a specific audience (e.g., current members, nonmembers, students) and that audience’s unique needs.

 
 

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Member Segmentation Survey

Key Findings:
Higher Grade members place a very high value on IEEE membership, indicating that they are proud to be members and feel that membership adds value to their lives.  In comparison to students, they are significantly more likely to have joined in order to remain technically current and access insurance and significantly more likely to be satisfied with insurance and other financial products and services;  they are less likely than students to recommend IEEE membership to a peer or colleague.

Compared to Higher Grade members, Student members view value of IEEE membership in a more positive light and consider it more affordable.  They are likely to have joined for education or career reasons as well as for reduced conference and activity rates.  Students are more likely than Higher Grade members to view all technical resources, career development opportunities, and products and services as important and to display higher satisfaction with IEEE networking opportunities.

In 2008, 69% of IEEE members were either Very or Somewhat Satisfied versus 80% in 2004.  However, patterns are unchanged for individual resources and products and services.  The most important member offerings continue to be online access to transactions, journals, and magazines;  online access to conference proceedings;  and online access to standards.  Satisfaction with these elements has remained fairly consistent over time, although online access to standards did decline from 37% Very Satisfied, Somewhat Satisfied, or Satisfied in 2004 to 29% in 2008.

The final goal of this study is an algorithm that uses data on all members (e.g., purchase of an IEEE product, donation to the Foundation) to categorize individuals into a small number of relatively stable, unique groups.  In 2004, four groups were identified based on nonrenewal risk;  in 2008, members were categorized into five groups based more on behavior and interests than on nonrenewal risk.

 
 

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Member and Geographic Activities Volunteer Contact Center Survey

Key Findings:
Four-fifths (81.0%) of respondents are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the support provided by MGA to help them perform their duties as volunteers.

Respondents are most likely to request support for Electronic Meeting Arrangements and in receiving MGA meeting agendas (both 54.5%).

Respondents’ most preferred conduits of MGA information are staff (60.0%), e-mail (30.0%), and the IEEE website (30.0%).

Only just over one-quarter (27.8%) of respondents believe that offering services to IEEE members in languages other than English is Important or Very Important.

 
 

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Employee Engagement Survey

Key Findings:
IEEE’s employee engagement Grand Mean (the average of the twelve main engagement survey questions) continues to increase, rising to the 59th percentile from the 48th in 2008 and the 34th in 2007.  Nearly all of the twelve items have increased, most by at least 5 percentile points.  The largest growth item is “knowing what is expected of me” (up 11 points), while “coworkers committed to quality” is the only item that has decreased (down 1 point). 

The best scored items are “having opinions that count,” “having the materials and equipment to do their job,” and “having discussed progress.” 

The items that score lowest are “coworkers committed to quality,” “know what is expected at work,” and “opportunity to do my best every day.”

 
 

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Internal Communications Focus Groups

Key Findings:
Many participants indicated that the staff website is poorly organized, making it too difficult to find needed information.  Similarly, the weekly e-newsletter contains a great deal of information but no clear hierarchy prioritizing necessary items. 

Several participants suggested finding better ways to connect staff to each other, both for specific tasks (e.g., knowing who to contact for a payroll problem) and for simply knowing one another better.  For example, participants indicated that the staff profiles on the Eye on the Institute are one of the first things they read. 

A number of participants mentioned that the culture of the organization needs to more actively encourage sharing and collaboration across units. 

Staff at locations outside of the Operations Center feel less connected to other staff. 

The Town Hall meetings led by the Executive Director are viewed very positively, but participants requested the option to ask anonymous questions.

 
 

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Internal Communications Survey

Key Findings:
Less than two-thirds (64.2%) of respondents indicated that internal communications at IEEE is effective. 

Most respondents (81.6%) feel that they receive IEEE-wide news at the right frequency, although 14.3% indicated that the news is not frequent enough.  Similarly, nearly three-quarters (74.2%) of respondents reported that they receive the right amount of information, while nearly one-fifth indicated that they receive too little. 

The most important news subjects are Human Resources benefits and policies, employees’ own departments, and Information Technology system outages.  

For most topics, almost three-quarters (73.4%) of respondents view e-mail as the most effective channel of communication.

 
 

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Member Use of Internet Survey

Key Findings:
The most frequently mentioned Internet activity is searching for information (94.7% of respondents), followed by reading technical information (79.4%). 

Nearly all respondents (96.0%) have broadband access either at home or at work/ school.  The most frequently used web browser is Firefox (60.6%), distantly followed by Internet Explorer 8 (27.4%) and Google Chrome (19.5%). 

When respondents were asked how they might want to interact with IEEE via the Internet, no more than one-third indicated any single area.  The most frequently cited potential area of interaction is RSS feeds for conferences, events, and news (30.8% of respondents Interested or Very Interested).

 
 

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IEEE Expert Now Trial Users Study

Key Findings:
All participants had reviewed 1-2 Expert Now online education courses. 

Participants rate current Expert Now course content highly, while ratings for course functionality and usefulness are slightly lower. 

Fewer than half of participants will recommend Expert Now online education courses to their libraries. 

The most desirable course platform features are “downloadable written transcript of presentation” and “audio presentation of material,” followed by “interactive simulations and modeling tools embedded in presentation that the learner can manipulate.” 

The most desirable course content feature is “demonstration modules that teach specific processes, procedures, or skills,” followed by “intermediate modules that provide greater depth on a narrower subject.”

 
 

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Human Resources Distance Learning Survey

Key Findings:
Respondents indicated that, across topics, the most preferred methods of distance learning are e-learning and virtual classes lasting 2-3 hours, with the best time of day being morning.  Recorded webcasts and asynchronous learning are the least desired delivery methods regardless of topic. 

Respondents are interested in courses covering desktop productivity (34.7% Very Interested), professional and business skills (29.5%), technical skills (27.3%), and management skills (26.6%);  e-learning is the favored delivery method for all topics except management skills. 

Most respondents (70.8%) indicated that they are likely to take 1-3 distance learning classes that carry a chargeback per year.

 
 

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Technical Experts Recruitment Survey

Key Findings:
Nearly all respondents (88.4%) are willing to serve as part of the IEEE Public Visibility technical experts program.  Of those who are not willing to participate, the majority (63.1%) indicated that their unwillingness is due to a lack of time. 

Of the topics on which the Public Visibility program is focused, the most frequently cited areas of expertise are Education (30.5% of respondents claim solid expertise), Networks/Telecommunications (24.4%), and Robotics (22.4%). 

One-half (49.7%) of respondents have participated in at least one interview with the media on technical or nontechnical topics during the past two years.

 
 

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IEEE Board of Directors Comparison Study

Key Findings:
Members of the Board of Directors are, on average, older and more likely to be retired than the overall IEEE membership. 

Board members are significantly more attached to IEEE (having more Society memberships, more years of service, and “Base” rather than “At Risk” member segmentation) and tend to be in the higher membership Grade Levels (Senior/Life Senior or Fellow/Life Fellow). 

Board members are more likely to be in education-related fields and from the United States or Region 9 and less likely to be from Regions 8 or 10 than is the general membership.

 
 

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Director-Elect Training Meeting Survey, February

Key Findings:
In comparison to many other IEEE events, satisfaction with Director-Elect training was low:  only approximately one-half of respondents were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the training or found the training useful. 

One-third of respondents indicated that the amount of information was “just right,” while nearly half indicated that there was too little information.

A number of respondents suggested that the training was too focused on detailed financial aspects and not enough on more practical, “big-picture,” or clearly targeted items (e.g., the most critical issues facing IEEE).

 
 

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May Town Hall Meeting Survey

Key Findings:
Just under half (47%) of respondents viewed the meeting via web streaming/web conferencing, while more than two-fifths (43%) attended in person;  only 8% of respondents neither attended nor viewed.  Nearly all respondents who neither attended nor viewed the meeting indicated that their absence was due to a time or vacation conflict.

Of those who watched the streaming or recorded web version, most (83%) experienced no technical problems.  Among the small number who did encounter difficulty, the most frequently mentioned issue was poor audio quality.

Just over two-thirds (69%) of respondents found the meeting to be Useful or Very Useful, and nearly all (89%) thought that the meeting was the right length of time.  Additionally, nearly three-quarters (71%) of respondents indicated that the Q&A portion of the meeting was Useful or Very Useful.

Almost all respondents (89%) indicated that they are Likely or Very Likely to attend or view future Town Hall meetings.  When asked their preferred frequency for such meetings, a bare majority (52%) of respondents recommends four per year, while most (43%) of the remainder prefer twice per year.

In respondents’ suggestions for future meeting topics, the most frequently mentioned items are IEEE’s goals and strategies, IEEE’s financial performance, and the “State of IEEE.”

In addition, several respondents requested the opportunity to submit questions in advance of the next meeting.  Other comments range from general praise (e.g., “Good job by everyone involved”) to complaints about the technology used (e.g., “Please get a better program than whatever this disappointing Adobe program is”).

 
 

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Director-Elect Training Meeting Survey, June

Key Findings:
Three-fifths (59%) of respondents were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the June training, and the remaining 41% were Neither Satisfied nor Dissatisfied.  These results demonstrate an improvement over the February Director-Elect training evaluation with a 7-point increase in satisfaction level (from 52% Satisfied or Very Satisfied in February) and, more significantly, a decrease from one-third of respondents dissatisfied with the February training to zero in June.

Responses were similar for usefulness of the June training:  61% felt it was Useful or Very Useful, while most of the rest (30%) were neutral on this point, again improving on February’s results.

While more than three-quarters (78%) of respondents thought that the length of the June training was “just right,” a majority (57%) felt that too little information was provided, an increase from February.

 
 

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Board of Directors Retreat Survey

Key Findings
Two-thirds (67%) of respondents were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the retreat, with only one person indicating that they were dissatisfied.  A number of respondents suggested that too much of the retreat was spent on strategic planning.

 
 

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IEEE International Symposium on Broadcast Multimedia

Key Findings:
This survey was conducted to assess satisfaction with the 2009 BMSB International Symposium held 13-15 May 2009 in Bilbao, Spain. 

Overall, attendees were very satisfied with the conference, nearly everyone (96%) indicating that they were satisfied or very satisfied and over half (58%) indicating they were very satisfied.  Most (82%) found the content was relevant or very relevant and of the information presented, well over three-quarters (85%) indicated it was the right amount of information. 

One of the open-ended comments states “'This was an excellently organized conference, one of the best that I attended.”  More than four-fifths (81%) rated the value as high or very high, although about one-quarter (26%) thought that it was too expensive.  By far the most common reasons cited for attending the conference was to gain new knowledge, followed by networking with other technology professionals. 

Of those who attended, well over three-quarters (83.7%) were presenters.  Just over half (54.3%) would have attended conference regardless of whether they were presenting, although three-quarters (75%) indicated they were likely to present in the future.

 
 

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IEEE Computer Society Survey

Key Findings
Higher Grade Inactive members have far more negative gaps between importance and satisfaction than do Higher Grade Active members.  The most significant negative gaps for Inactive members—areas that likely represent disappointment with the Society—are in access to practical content related to work and in helping to stay current on technical developments.  The only significant gap between importance and satisfaction among Active members is in access to practical content related to their work.

Similarly, Affiliate Inactive members have far more negative gaps between importance and satisfaction than do Affiliate Active members.  The most significant negative gap areas for Inactive members are access to practical content related to work, helping to stay current on technical developments, enhancing professional stature, helping to find solutions to technical programs, and career support.  There is only one small negative gap between importance and satisfaction among Active members:  helping to stay current on technical developments.

Overall familiarity with most of the new Computer Society individual benefits, products, and services is quite low.  The most familiar new benefit is 600 Safari Online books, but fewer than one-quarter of Higher Grade Active and only 16% of Higher Grade Inactive members are aware of even this benefit.  Several benefits with which Higher Grade Inactive members have low familiarity also seem to be important, suggesting that raising awareness might improve their intention to renew.

Higher Grade Inactive and Affiliate Inactive members react strongly to the importance of accessing Computer Society technical content to their professional success, with 35% of Higher Grade Inactive and 41% of Affiliate Inactive members saying it is Important or Very Important.  This finding, coupled with the gap between importance and satisfaction that these groups have with accessing practical content related to their work, suggests a critical avenue for delivering value to these groups.

 
 

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IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics Survey

Key Findings:
Respondents indicated that the greatest advantage to receiving the TVCG special issue is access to all papers from the conferences (84.8% of respondents), but only 10.6% of respondents feel that having all the papers precludes the need to attend the conferences.

Well over one-half (56.8%) of respondents indicated that there are no disadvantages to the special issue;  of the disadvantages that were reported, the most frequently cited is that the issue is too large (fewer than one-tenth of respondents). 

Nearly three-quarters (74.0%) of respondents feel that the expanded issue increases the value of their TVCG subscriptions.  Nonetheless, when respondents were asked if they would agree to a moderately increased subscription rate in order to cover the cost of the issue next year, only approximately one-quarter (25.8%) did so. 

When asked if the inclusion of all papers from the IEEE Visualization Conference 2009 and the IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization in TVCG would affect the likelihood of their attendance at these conferences in the future, well over one-half of respondents reported that it would not.  More respondents predicted that the expanded issue would increase the likelihood of their conference attendance (27.6%) than predicted a decrease in their attendance due to the special issue (14.1%).

 
 

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IEEE Investment Fund Survey

Key Findings:
Investment Fund customers are generally satisfied with IEEE’s services:

  • Respondents are most satisfied with the timeliness of statements (90% of respondents Satisfied or Highly Satisfied).
  • Satisfaction is lower for both the content and the clarity of statements, with 30% of respondents indicating that they are less than satisfied on each of these characteristics.

IEEE’s staff receive good marks for overall service level.  Customers are satisfied with the professionalism of IEEE staff (100% Satisfied or Highly Satisfied), their prompt responses to inquiries and requests (90%), the overall service received from IEEE staff (90%), and the knowledge they exhibit (100%).

 
 

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IEEE Concentration Banking Survey

Key Findings:
Concentration Banking customers are generally very satisfied with IEEE’s services;  fewer than 6% of respondents are less than satisfied with any aspect of the service:

• Respondents are most satisfied with the accuracy of account activity (63% of respondents Highly Satisfied).
• Approximately one-half of respondents are Highly Satisfied with the clarity of statements and with the content of statements.

IEEE’s Concentration Banking staff also receive good marks for overall service level.  Customers are satisfied with the professionalism of IEEE staff (61% Highly Satisfied), their prompt responses to inquiries and requests (52%), the overall service received from IEEE staff (56%), and the knowledge they exhibit (56%).
Nearly all respondents (93%) are signed up for Internet access to their account and statements.

 
 

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IEEE Expert Now Newsletter Reader Survey

Key Findings:
Nearly half (46.6%) of respondents read the Expert Now newsletter a minimum of “most of the time”;  however, only half (50.0%) of these regular readers are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the newsletter.  The most frequently cited topics of interest are newly released tutorials (82.4%) and tutorials to be released in the near future (64.7%).

 
 

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IEEE Express Conference Publishing Survey

Key Findings:
Overall, respondents hold a very positive view of eXpress Conference Publishing: 

• Nearly all respondents (95.1%) reported that they are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with eXpress Conference Publishing, with only one person indicating dissatisfaction.
• Similarly, the majority (60.0%) of respondents rated their likelihood to recommend eXpress Conference Publishing to a colleague as 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale, with only two customers rating their likelihood less than 7.

The single area of dissatisfaction is cost:  two-fifths (41.7%) of respondents are less than satisfied with the cost of the service.

 
 

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Panel of Editors Survey

Key Findings:
The vast majority (80%) of respondents are Editors-in-Chief;  two-thirds have attended prior Panel of Editors meetings, with most (nearly nine-tenths) of those attending regularly.

Three-quarters of respondents feel that the meeting is a Good or Very Good value relative to the cost and time associated with their attendance.

Of the reasons for attending the Panel of Editors meeting, rated most important is opportunities to meet with staff, followed by opportunities to network with other Editors-In-Chief and other volunteers.  When rating how IEEE met their expectations, respondents gave the highest scores to these same two areas.  Rated least important as reasons for attending are logistical issues (meeting location, hotel location, convenience of getting to the hotel from the airport).

The three presentations/discussions from which the greatest number of respondents benefited the most were “Manuscript Central Update – Keith Collier,” “Meet with Staff,” and “IEEE Xplore Update – Gerry Grenier.”

For the 2010 Panel of Editors meeting, approximately one-third of respondents indicated that the location is irrelevant.  Among those for whom location does matter, slightly more will be likely to attend if the meeting is held in Boston, MA, rather than in Piscataway or Newark, NJ.

The top choice to reduce future meeting costs is to eliminate the Saturday reception.

 
 

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IEEE Power Engineering Society Joint Technical Committee Meeting Survey

Key Findings:
More than three-quarters (78%) of respondents rated PES JTCM Good or Very Good, and more than four-fifths (81%) indicated that their attendance was Useful or Very Useful. 

Respondents attended a larger number of Working Group meetings or Technical Sessions than they have in the past, with more than two-fifths attending at least eight meetings/sessions and under one-fifth attending less than four.  Respondents were fairly evenly split on their session attendance at this year’s Meeting, with just under two-fifths indicating that they attended more or different sessions than usual and just over two-fifths indicating that they only had time to attend their usual sessions. 

Nearly all respondents (92%) plan to participate in future Meetings, and most (76%) are willing to invite someone along to the next Meeting they attend.  One-half (50%) of respondents are willing to mentor a new attendee at a future Meeting.

 
 

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Accessing the Future Conference Recommendations Survey

Key Findings:
The top seven recommendations (rated "Absolutely Essential" by more than half of respondents) are:

• Improve accessibility of MAINSTREAM collaboration technology, making those tools more accessible, inclusive, and robust.
• Ensure that accessibility and the needs of people with disabilities are incorporated into the education of those who will generate future Information and Communication Technology (ICT).
• Build accessibility into the ICT infrastructure as a natural part that anyone operating under constraints can invoke as needed, including those with little or no resources.
• Support accessible communication.
• Standardize patient-centric longitudinal medical records and care data to facilitate secure but rapid sharing across all aspects of clinical care, public health policy, and practice.
• Design human factors (usability, accessibility, etc.) into all systems to ensure usability, effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction with use by the intended persons, effectively capitalizing on digital communication.
• Improve public transportation to facilitate employment.

The five recommendations with the lowest average scores are:

• Internationally create National Agendas for accessibility and inclusion that include long-term support across all of the sectors/areas needed to achieve access.
• Build capacity in consumers and consumer groups in cross-disability, technology, standards, policy, and “realities of industry” aspects so they can more fully and effectively provide vigilance and side-by-side participation (inside and outside of companies).
• Utilize economic drivers.
• Integrate funding for multimodal transportation and end-user needs.
• Clearly define government’s guiding role as a partner and advocate on behalf of patients and caregivers in all facets of healthcare.

In looking across the tracks, Track 3 (Online Communities and the Workplace) has the highest average scores.

 
 

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Accessing the Future Conference Satisfaction Survey

Key Findings:
The majority (82.0%) of respondents were Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the conference.  Similarly, most (88.5%) indicated that the content presented was relevant to them.

The most frequently cited reasons for attending the conference were networking with other professionals (67.2%) and advancing the cause of accessibility (62.5%).

 
 

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Kingston Section Member

Key Findings:
Just over half (53.0%) of respondents are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with their IEEE membership, and only just over one-third (35.2%) are Satisfied or Very Satisfied with the Kingston Section.

Nearly half (46.2%) of respondents had participated in at least one Section activity, with attending a Section meeting (26.9%) the most frequently cited involvement.  When asked about potential participation in future activities, the most popular activities are workshops/seminars (45.1% Likely or Very Likely to participate) and tutorials/courses (44.3%).  Least popular are Section business meetings (10.1%).

When asked if they are willing to volunteer to help Section committees or groups, nearly half (44.6%) of respondents consent and provide their contact information.

 
 

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IEEE-USA Eye on Washington Readership Survey

Key Findings:
This survey was conducted to understand the opinions and thoughts of current subscribers to the IEEE-USA Eye on Washington newsletter.

A little more than three-quarters of those surveyed were IEEE members. The largest group of respondents work in private industry, at just under 50%.

The next largest group of respondents were retirees, at slightly more than 10%. On a 5-point scale, where 1 is poor and 5 is excellent, two-thirds rated the newsletter’s overall quality a 4 or 5. A slightly smaller percentage (61%) indicated that they were satisfied or very satisfied with their subscription to the newsletter.

Only about half of respondents read more than the summary e-mail. The vast majority (66%) prefer the current version of the e-mail (a summary with links to a webpage).

 
 

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American Society of Association Executives Decision to Give Survey

Key Findings:
IEEE members are generous:  79.6% report giving to a cause in the past 12 months, contributing an estimated 3.95% of household income.  However, 78.3% of respondents have never given to IEEE.

IEEE appears to rely especially heavily on retired members for non-dues support as compared to other associations.  Donors to IEEE are also more educated and have been in the profession longer.

IEEE members are less wealthy than members of some other associations in this study;  however, income levels appear to be a weak indicator of IEEE giving (although they may predict gift size).

Although three-quarters of IEEE members have never given to IEEE, many of them are likely candidates for IEEE support.  Among them are many individuals who support other causes, volunteer for IEEE, have interests that IEEE can meet, expect their employment situation to improve, or have levels of member satisfaction that warrant IEEE efforts to engage them.

In terms of preferred solicitation and giving methods, IEEE members overall do not differ from respondents in other organizations.  However, IEEE members do indicate lower tolerance for personal solicitations and greater tolerance for media appeals and membership forms. 

IEEE members may be harder to motivate than members from some other associations;  nonetheless, IEEE members do seem especially interested in causes related to disaster response and public safety, human and social services, and international aid.

 
 

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Foundation Survey of Donors

Key Findings:
More than half (62.6%) of respondents were unaware of the IEEE Foundation prior to participating in the survey.  Of those who were aware of the Foundation prior to the survey, nearly half (46.0%) learned of the Foundation during membership renewal. 

Two-thirds (66.0%) of respondents have never visited the Foundation website, and more than three-quarters (82.5%) have never made a contribution to the Foundation;  nearly all (98.5%) have never received grant money from the Foundation.

Respondents are overwhelmingly “Not Aware” of the types of programs supported by the IEEE Foundation;  nonetheless, nearly all respondents (94.0%) feel it is Important or Very Important to support at least one initiative.
 
Respondents are most willing to support initiatives in the area of “Education – improving primary and secondary math and science learning and increase interest in engineering and science” (84.0% of respondents feel that this area is Important or Very Important to support).

 
 

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IEEE Expert Now Trial Users

Key Findings: 
All participants had reviewed 1-2 Expert Now online education courses.

Participants rate current Expert Now course content highly, while ratings for course functionality and usefulness are slightly lower.

Fewer than half of participants will recommend Expert Now online education courses to their libraries. 

The most desirable course platform features are “downloadable written transcript of presentation” and “audio presentation of material,” followed  “interactive simulations and modeling tools embedded in presentation that the learner can manipulate.”

The most desirable course content feature is “demonstration modules that teach specific processes, procedures, or skills,” followed by “intermediate modules that provide greater depth on a narrower subject.”

 
 

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Human Resources Distance Learning Survey

Key Findings:
Respondents indicated that, across topics, the most preferred methods of distance learning are e-learning and virtual classes lasting 2-3 hours, with the best time of day being morning.  Recorded webcasts and asynchronous learning are the least desired delivery methods regardless of topic.

Respondents are interested in courses covering desktop productivity (34.7% Very Interested), professional and business skills (29.5%), technical skills (27.3%), and management skills (26.6%);  e-learning is the favored delivery method for all topics except management skills. 

Most respondents (70.8%) indicated that they are likely to take 1-3 distance learning classes that carry a chargeback per year.

 
 

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PES Joint Technical Committee Meeting Survey

Key Findings:
More than three-quarters (78%) of respondents rated PES JTCM Good or Very Good, and more than four-fifths (81%) indicated that their attendance was Useful or Very Useful.

Respondents attended a larger number of Working Group meetings or Technical Sessions than they have in the past, with more than two-fifths attending at least eight meetings/sessions and under one-fifth attending less than four.  Respondents were fairly evenly split on their session attendance at this year’s Meeting, with just under two-fifths indicating that they attended more or different sessions than usual and just over two-fifths indicating that they only had time to attend their usual sessions.

Nearly all respondents (92%) plan to participate in future Meetings, and most (76%) are willing to invite someone along to the next Meeting they attend.  One-half (50%) of respondents are willing to mentor a new attendee at a future Meeting. 

 
 

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PES Editors Survey

Key Findings:
Most respondents are assigning reviewers once a week on average, prompted by either by an email alert (49%) or by a visit to Manuscript Central (37%).

Respondents indicated that delays in assigning reviewers are primarily due to the fact that are simply too busy. Nonetheless, there was no significant support for routine assistance with the assignment of reviewers, with 37% of respondents indicating that they don't need help and 35% stating that the would welcome help only when the deem it necessary.

Respondents largely do not find the system for selecting reviewers to be confusing, but they did note that the information about reviewers could be improved and that the number of qualified reviewers could be increased.

By a slight majority (57% to 43%), the editors are not interested in a system that would automatically assign and notify reviewers when a manuscript revision is submitted. 

 
 

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C37.2 Function Numbers Survey

Key Findings:
The seven device numbers (10, 22, 35, 58, 70, 82, 93) varied considerably on whether or not respondents thought they should be kept, ranging from Device 70 which over 40% thought should "definitely" or "probably" be kept to  Device 22 which 9% rated likewise. A large quantity of open-ended feedback was also obtained, particularly about the numbering system used for the standard.

 
 

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What Is Known About Members

Key Findings:
Overall, members maintain their membership for many reasons with no single benefit appealing to all members and all benefits seen as not valuable by some members.

Retention rates are significantly lower among student members, while the retention rate for higher grade members is relatively stable and above the norms for associations.

Those that are less tied to IEEE tend to be younger, in industry as opposed to academia, and have a bachelors degree as their highest degree.

 
 

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Strategic Research Annual Report 2012

The IEEE Strategic Research Annual Report 2012 (PDF, 696 KB) summarizes research findings from 60 IEEE Strategic Research and Planning studies completed in 2012.

Please contact Marc Beebe to receive more information on the studies in the report.